As an American living in the Persian Gulf, I can attest that those who are within the range of Iraqi Scud missiles view the impending war as a mistake that will only increase anti-Americanism -- the cause of Islamic terrorism against the West.

While most Arabs and Europeans cheered George W. Bush's election, they soon felt betrayed by his abandonment of the Middle East peace process, his withdrawal from the Kyoto global-warming treaty and a litany of other unilateral foreign policy positions. While most Americans believe that the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks were in the planning stages for many years, the perception many Arabs and Europeans share is that Osama bin Laden had been trying to take action for years and that President Bush's stances galvanized the support needed to pull them off.

Now many people believe that America's need for cheap oil is a greater threat to world peace than Saddam Hussein or Osama bin Laden. Right or wrong, if the greatest perceived threat to world peace wages war against the will of the United Nations, how could world security and stability be the result?

Let us not forget that the 9/11 terrorists were led and funded by citizens of our strongest Persian Gulf ally, not by Iraq.

PETER SLOAN EIDENT

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates