U.S. delegate Brady Tyson today apologized for apologizing yesterday for past American actions in Chile and was summoned to the State Department for consultations.

Meanwhile, the resolution he co-sponsored was adopted by the U.N. Human Rights Commission by a vote of 26 to 1, with Uruguay - itself the target of international criticism for human-rights violations - the only country opposed.

The United States, which had abstained until now on similar condemnations of Chile, was one of the co-sponsored and the State Department made it clear that Tyson had been authorized to commit the United States to co-sponsorship.

Tyson said he "did not anticipate" that his apology would cause a problem, adding: "I did not get clearance because of a time pressure. I should have had it cleared. I regret that I exceeded my instructions." He said, however, that he does not regret the statement itself.

Tyson, a specialist in Latin American affairs named to the U.S. delegation in Geneva by the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Andrew Young, said he believes his "personal statement" to be "in the spirit of the Carter government foreign policy as I understand it."

In Washington, a State Department spokesman said that Tyson was not being recalled, but rather being asked to come to the department for a review of his speech and "procedures to be followed in making U.S. policy."

Passage of the resolution today marked the fourth straight year that the commission has condemned Chile, but the emphasis was slightly different. This year the accent was disappearances of opponents of the regime, while last year's stressed torture.

West German delegate Gerhard Jahn said his government, which supported the resolution today, had abstained last year because of what proved to be an "unfounded" hope that the situation in Chile would improve. Instead, he added, "The situation appears to have worsened."

West German delegate Gerhard Jahn said his government, which supported the resolution today, had astained last year because of what proved to be an "unfounded" hope that the situation in Chile would prove. Instead, he added, "the situation appears to have worsened."

Some observers felt that the flap had damaged the U.S. delegation's credibility, and in Moscow, the Soviet government newspaper, Izvestia, contrasted yesterday's State Department disavowal of Tyson's statement with Carter's campaign statements, especially in the televised foreign-policy debate last October in San Francisco, where he said the Republican administration "overthrew an elected government and helped establish a dictatorship" in Chile.

One delegate here called Tyson statement and the disavowal "an incredibly amateurish way of diplomacy," while a Latin American diplomat said he saw in it "a tactic for airing President Carter's views without facing the consequences."

In Mexico City, however, Hortensia Bussy de Allende - widow of Salvador Allende, killed in the September 1973 coup that overthrew his government - welcomed Tyson's statement as "a surprise that pleased us immensely because we at last see the truth coming out."

A State Department spokesman in Washington said that under a new administration there are bound to be "some lapses or confusion from time to time."

The spokesman called Tyson "a new man," adding: "This is the first time he has served in this capacity."

He did not say whom Tyson would meet with at the department, but it was presumed that they would be officials of the International Organizations Bureau and the Office of Human Rights Affairs.