President Carter's choice to supervise State Department Latin American policy said yesterday that he expects good relations soon will be restored with the five Latin Ameican nations that have rejected U.S. military assistance in anger at U.S. criticism of their human rights policies.

Ambassador Terence A. Todman said the present problems with these nations - Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Guatemala and El Salvador - will solve themselves quite soon.

At the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on his nomination to be assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs, Todman described the human rights disputeations with Latin America.

He predicted that good relations soon will be restored with the five Latin American nations that have rejected U.S. military assistance in anger at U.S. criticism of their human rights policies.

Ambassador Terence A. Todman said the present problems with these natios - Brazil, Argentina, Urguguay, Guatemala and El Salvador - will solve themselves quite soon.

At the Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on his nomination to be assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs, Todman described the human rights disputes as one of a series of ups and downs in Washington's relations with Latin Americas.

He predicted that good relations would resume when the Latin Americans understand the firm commitment of the Carter administration to human rights and see that U.S. reports on human rights abuses around the wold are not inferences in the internal affairs of other nations.

Todman, who is ambassador to Costa RIca, said he is not very disturbed by the present anger of some Latin American naitos very the U.S. reporters.

Sen. Dick Stone (D-Fla.) questioned TOdman about human rights in Panama and Cuba in connection with the ongoing negotiations for a new Panama Canal treaty and President Carter's U.S.-Cuban relations.

Todman said there is no information that any of the 84 American citizens in Cuba who do not also have Cuban citizenship want to leave the island unless they can bring members of their families.

He also said it is impossible to verify how many political prisoners are being held in Cuba but had heard estimates from 15,000 to many times that number.

Two witnesses, Laurence R. Birns of the Council on Hemispheric Affairs and Manuel Fierro American Citizens, testified against Todman's nomination.

The cited Todman's less than two years of experience in Latin America during his career with the State J. Sparkman (D-Ala.) and several other senators indicated Todman would be confirmed without difficulty.