Four present and two former State Department officials were nominated to ambassadorial posts yesterday by President Carter.

The nominees include Lawrence S. Eagleburger, who was executive assistant to former Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger, to be ambassador to Yugoslavia, and Harry W. Shlaudeman, who once was accused of lying to a congressional committee about U.S. involvement in the overthrow of the Allende regime in Chile, to be ambassador to Peru.

Deputy chief of the U.S. embassy in Santiago in 1969-73, Shlaudeman testified in 1974 that the embassy resisted pressure to become involved in Chile's internal affairs. It was subsequently revealed that the Central Intelligence Agency - on recommendation of the U.S. embassy in Santiago - had been involved in a program of covert operations during this time.

Shlaudeman publicly defended his original testimony on grounds that the cover operations did not constitute intervention in Chile's internal affairs. He was later confirmed by the Senate to be assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs.

The President's other nominees yesterday:

Arthur A. Hartman, assistant secretary of state for European affairs, to be ambassador to France.

Donald C. Bergus, deputy chief of the U.S. mission in Ankara, Turkey, to be ambassador to the Sudan.

James G. Lowenstein, deputy assistant secretary of state for European affairs, to be ambassador to Luxembourg.

Robert H. Miller, deputy assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, to be ambassador to Malaysia.