A Toronto Star reporter who flew to Uganda last week without a visa and against the advice of Canadian diplomats here has not been heard from since.

The Canadian embassy here has tried informally to locate the reporter, Gerald Utting, through the French embassy in Kampala, which looks after Canadian interests in Uganda, but has had no success. Friends of Utting here have telephoned hotels in Kampala, but none reports knowing anything about him.

Uganda Information Ministry official Abdul Nassir, reached by telephone from Nairobi today, said, "I know nothing about this man."St(Toronto Star foreign editor Michael Pieri said that although the paper had not heard from Uttingsince before be left for Uganda Wednesday, it was 'not uduly concerned" because Utting had expected to spend several days in Uganda and was not expected to contact his paper until he left there.

(Although the Toronto had expected "difficulty" for Utting, Pieri said, it felt that his chances in Uganda might be better than other Western correspondents' because Uganda has always held Canadians "in high esteem." However, two weeks ago Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau sharply critized Ugandan leaders Idi Amin as a mass killed."

Utting boarded an Air France flight bound for Entebbe, Uganda, Wednesday morning. Before leaving, he spoke to Gor Pardy, first secretary at the Canadian embassy here. "We most definitely advised him not to go to Uganda without press clearance," Pardy said.

Utting's cabled application to Uganda's Information Ministry for permission for his trip was not answered. According to friends, Utting feared that if he pursued the matter his request would be formally turned down, so he flew to Uganda without permission.

The only Western correspondents known to have entered Uganda this month were Audrey June Taylor of WWRL radio station in New York, who was part of a black American study tour financed by the Ugandan government, and an American freelancer who cautiously entered the country posing as a tourist. Both are now out of the country.

The Daily Nation, a newspaper here, said today quoted "a reliable source in Kampala" as saying that Europeans were taken away from Entebbe airport by officials of the State Research Bureau, security force Amin created. Ugandan refugees, say the Research Bureau is responsible for most of the killings in the country.

Correspondents for major Western publications have generally avoided Uganda in recent years. In 1971 Nicholas Stroh, an American free-lancer who also wrote for the Toronto Star, was killed while investigating reports of atrocities among provincial tribes in Uganda.

Utting, a Canadian citizen based in Toronto, was once held incommunicado in Beirut for four days by one of the city's warring factions.

The only Western correspondents known to have entered Uganda this month were Audrey June Taylor of WWRL radio station in New York, who was part of a black American study tour financed by the Ugandan government, and an American free-lancer who who cautiously entered the country posing as a tourist. Both are now out of the country.

The Daily Nation, a newspaper here, said today quoted that "a reliable source in Kampala" as saying that four Europeans were taken away from Entebbe airport by officials of the State Research Bureau, the security force Amin created. Ugandan refugees say the Research Bureau is responsible for most of the killings in the country.

Correspondents for major Western publications have generally avoided Uganda in recent years. In 1971 Nicholas Stroh, an American free-lancer who also wrote for the Toronto Star, was killed while investigating reports of atrocities among provincial tribes in Uganda.

Utting, a Canadian citizen based in Toronto, was once held incommunicado in Beirut for four days by one of the city's warring factions.