The operators of a betting ring that catered to District of Columbia white collar professionals who bet thousands of dollars a week on basketball and football games, were convicted yesterday after an unusual legal proceeding in which the names of the prominent betters were kept secret.

Among the customers reportedly overheard on federal wiretaps used to investigate the gambling charges againdst Peter and Nocholas Ginaris were several well-known mewdia personalities, dentists, lawyers at least one congressional aide who indicated he was placing bets for his congressman.

In past years, the Gianaries convictions and the reputations of being philanthropists-gamblers who donate heavily to charities and befriend prominent national sportys figures - are reported to have numbered among their customers several White House aides in the Kennedy administration, several federal sources said.

The Gianarises were convicted yesterday by U.S. District Judge Charles R. Richey after a nonjury trial that was based on a detailed 35 page report by the government outlining the case sagainst them.

In the legal proceeding called a "stipulated trial," Gianaries confirmed the facts of the case presented by the govcernment. They apparently agreed to the procedure in order to avoid a long complex trial but to still retain rights to appeal on specific legal issues. Had they pleased quilty thry would have lost their rights to appeal. Apparently the Gianaries intend to challenge on appeal the propriety of the government's use of wiretaps to amke the case.

Although the stipulation filed in the Gianaries case is unsually precise in the description of the manner in which the gambling operations was conducted, it identified the cooperating better-withnesses against the gamblers only by numbers. Stipulated trials routinely have gibven the names of the withnesses who providing the evidendce against the defendants.

U.S. Attorney Earl J. Silbert said he personally directed the names be taken out of the stipulation after attorneys for some of the bettors resquested that their clients' name be kept out of the public record.

He said he made thqat decision, which was opened by several of his assistants who felt the names should be made public as bettors' names have in the past, because the names were not essential to the government's attempt to get a conviction and because the defendants did not oppose the procedure. He said he could not remember a similar request being made in the past.

As deatiled in the submission of evidence against the Gianaries their betting operation in 1955 and the first month of 1976 was a highly organized production that accepted of up to $30,000 a day. The minimum was $100 and the maximum bet was $300 for new customers and regular games, but there was no limit on the amount that could be bet by certain persons and on certain championship events, the evidence said.

Regular bettors would be sent by mail the weekly schedule of games on which bets could be placed. This was usually enclosed in a greeting or religious card, the evidence said.

Payoffs and collections would be made in various ways, including certified mail or by circuit-riding underling who would go to offices or designated restauranys to meet with betors.

ON at least one occasion, Peter Gianaries collected nearly $4,000 in losses owned him by another gambler who had come to visit Gianaries in a hospital bed at Georgetown University Hospital, the evidence said .

Transcript of wiretops made public by the U.S.Attorney's Office in connection with the documentary trial showed the bettring ring to be a generally friendly operations in which persons were able to run up fairly large taps beofore Gianaries would cut them off from future play.

Based on the wiretaps, Peter Gianaries was the leader, and would sometimes squabble with his brother Nicholas over the manner in which he would allow some people to bet.

The Gianaries also seemed concerned at the time of the 1976 Super Bowl as to whether could get tickets for the event, and they asked a man in Florida who supplied them with the weekly betting "line" if he would make sure the tickets were avaible, according to the transcripts.

The betters identified themselves to the Gianaries on the telephone calls in code-names such as Dixie. Eighty-Four, Gas. G-3. Pee Wee, MP. Mr. V and Zenith, the evidence continued.

The government said there were at least 80 regular customers of the operations and that in an 18-day period ending on Super Bowl Sunday, 1976 1,482 of the 1,504 calls intercepted on the Gianaries operation's telephonies were related to gambling.

Payoffs and collections would be made in various ways, including certified mail or by a circuit-riding underling who would go to offices or designated restaurants to meet with bettors.

On at least one occasion, Peter Gianaries collected nearly $4,000 in losses owed him by another gambler who had come to visit Gianaris in a hospital bed at Georgetown University Hospital, the evedence said.

Transcripts of wiretaps made public by the U.S. Attorney's Office in connection with the case showed the betting ring to be a generally friendly operation in which persons were able to run up fairly large tabs before Gianaries would cut them off from future play.

Based on the wiretaps, Peter Gianaries was the leader, and would sometimes squabble with his brother Nicholas over the manner in which he would allow some people to bet.