Before 1970, Albert Canfora considered himself nothing more than a work-a-day union man at the Goodyear Aerospace plant near Akron.

"I didn't care about the war," Canfora says with a matter-of-fact shrug, lighting another cigarette. "I was a union leader dealing in wages, hours and conditions.Kent State changed all that."

Canfora's son, Alan, was one of the nine wounded by National Guard bullets that also killed four on May 4, 1970, and which resulted in protests that rocked the nation.

And the Canfora name has become synonymous hereabouts with the stormy protest movement against the construction of a new university gymnasium near the site where the shottings took place.

On Tuesday, in the country's first such election, the voters in Canfora's ward expressed their displeasure with the change in the 51-year-old Democrat who had been their councilman.

On Tuesday, Albert Canfora became the latest victim of Kent State when he was recalled from his post by a 3-to-1 margin.

The campaign against him in this heavily Democratic blue-collar city of 33,000 near Akron began shortly after Canfora and five members of his family - including Alan, the son who had been shot - were arrested July 12 during a mass demonstration at the construction site.

"What business," asked one of the petition leaders at the time, "does a lawmaker have breaking the law." The question immediately bestirred others to join the anti-Canfora campaign.

"The truth is," Canfora has replied to his critics, "these people are afraid of the things I have stood for and supported over the years." He has come to learn, he says, through the Ken State experience that what he now calls the establishment - including segments of organized labor and the local Democratic power structure - is not that interested in reforms and justice.

It was obviously the wounding of his son that set him off in a new direction. "I have been concerned about the injustices of the shootings," he says, adding that his interest was "an expression of my civil rights in a peaceful, passive protest against the wrongful construction of a building that would destroy historical land."

But Mayor Lawrence Maurer, who professed "neutrality" throughout the recall campaign, nevertheless let it be known that he felt that "civil disobedience is not a luxury public officials can enjoy."

He added that Canfora should have expected trouble from his front-line protests at Kent State:

"Barberton," the mayor said, "is heavily ethnic, religious and conservative."

Although Canfora's party chairman and union president seemed to defend his actions, what other support he might have expected from friends was chilled by the dark mood of the city. "Around here," said one Democrat, "Kent State is not one of your more popular crusades."

Although Canfora's party chairman and union president seemed to defend his actions, what other support he might have expected from friends was chilled by the dark mood of the city. "Around here," said one Democrat, "Kent State is not one of your more popular crusades."

Back in the 1960s, Canfora was elected to three successive two-year terms. But in 1971, the first year after the Kent State tragedy, as Canfora joined the parents of other student victims in various protests and legal proceedings, he was defeated in a bid for a fourth term.

He lost again in 1973, but two years later made a political comeback by winning a tight race for a four-year term against a Republican candidate.

But this year the ads bought by Canfora's critics in The Barberton Herald demanded his recall in warlike type. "Do you want a councilman who has willfully violated a court order?" screamed one ad, which exclaimed the answer: "No"

"I've been arrested once and convicted of nothing," said Canfora in his typically soft-spoken voice.

Altogether, Canfora, his wife, Anna, three sons and a daughter have been arrested 14 times for various protest-related charges.All are misdemeanors and none has been decided in the courts.

After his loss Tuesday night, Canfora said he was "not at all bitter." And he seemed confident that his cause would somehow be vindicated.

"I don't plan to give up now," he said. "I've lost before . . . and people grow with experience."