President Carter renewed his support of full voting representation in Congress for the District in his State of the Union speech last night.

Carter also reasserted his administration's backing of "a Series of reforms . . . designed to give the residents of the District significantly greater control over their local affairs" that he first proposed last Sept. 21.

"My administration will continue to work for the passage of those reforms this year." Carter said in a brief mention of the city.

The President's statement comes just two weeks before the House Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on a resolution that proposes full voting rights for District residents.

James Dyke, Vice President Mondale's special assistant for domestic policy, said last night that the resolution has a "very good chance" on the House floor this year.

If it should get the needed votes in the House, the proposal is likely to meet with strong opposition in the Senate, where passage would dilute the power of the 100 Senators.

The recommendations to expand home rule include abolition of the federal enclaves, which was established to protect federal property in the city; removal of Presidential authority over some city legislation; budget autonomy for the District government by 1984, and commitment of federal funds on the city's unfunded liabilities of more than $2 billion and million in outstanding loans on Robert F. Kennedy Stadium.

The resolution would give the city two senators and the appropriate proportional representation (probably two seats) in the House, instead of the present single nonvoting delegate in the House.

D. C. Del. Walter E. Fauntroy said, "I'm pleased the President has delivered on his promise. I'm also pleased that the work of the White House staff has matched the President's commitment."

The resolution, which would result in a constitutional amendment, is expected to pass the judiciary committee when it votes Jan. 31, as it did last year.But the resolution requires a two-thirds vote by the full House and Senate to set in motion the ratification procedure by the states.

The resolution won a simple majority last year in the House, 229-181, but fell short of the needed two-thirds majority.

Elena Hess, executive director of Self-Determination for D.C., a national coalition, said mention of the proposal in the State of the Union speech was "a good sign."

She said that since the President first gave his support to full voting rights last fall, White House lobbyists have met several times with supporters of the cause, and are actively planning strategy that she thinks makes passage by two-thirds of the House this year "a possibility."

James Dyke, Vice President Mondale's special assistant for domestic policy, said last night that the resolution has a "very good chance" on the House floor this year.

If it should get the needed votes in the House, the proposal is likely to meet with strong opposition in the Senate where passage would dilute the power of the 100 Senators.

Those recommendations included abolishing the federal enclave, established to protect federal property in the city; removal of Presidential authority over some city legislation; budget autonomy for the District government by 1984, and commitment of federal funds on the city's unfunded pension liabilities of more than $2 billion and million in outstanding loans on Robert F. Kennedy stadium.