Former attorney general John N. Mitchell has agreed to testify today before a House subcommittee investigating why the Justice Department did not pursue U.S. intelligence reports of South Korean influence-buying in Congress.

Mitchell, who is on medical furlough from serving a prison term for his role in the Watergate cover-up, is also expected to be asked whether he warned members of Congress about the Korean lobbyists.

The international organizations subcommittee, chaired by Rep. Donald M. Fraser (D-Minn.), has been studying U.S.-Korean relations. The hearing scheduled for today continues an examination of executive branch awareness of the Korean lobbying effort.

The international organizations subcommittee, chaired by Rep. Donald M. Fraser (D-Minn.), has been studying U.S.-Korean relations. The hearing scheduled for today continues an examination of executive branch awareness of the Korean lobbying effort.

A spokesman said yesterday that the subcommittee is still trying to work out an arrangement to obtain former secretary of state Henry A. Kissinger's testimony in the matter.

A retired Justice Department attorney who headed the foreign agents registration section, an FBI counter-intelligence specialist, and the former inspector general of the Department of Agriculture also are scheduled to testify today.

Summaries of U.S. intelligence reports released by the subcommittee last week indicate that the FBI and Justice failed to pursue evidence that such suspected Korean agents as Washington businessman Tongsun Park were improperly lobbying members of Congress.