Mr. CULVER . . . If there was a strip through Alabama - let us take the hypothetical example - if there was a strip through Alabama 50 miles long and 10 miles wide, and the people of Alabama were of the view that the circumstances under which that foreign occupying power got hold of that territory stunk - simply stunk, s-t-u-n-k - why would they think it stunk? . . .

Suppose this whole situation were reversed, and in the year 1903 it was the Deep South - it was Alabama that had this unique geographic position in the world that gave rise to the desirability of a powerful nation somewhere else, let us call it Panama, wanting to dig a ditch right across a 50-mile swath 10 miles wide in Alabama . . .

Mr. ALLEN . . . [T]he distinguished senator from Iowa [Mr. Culver] [has] made several references in a most hostile fashion to my state of Alabama, which I resent very much, and I would like to have the opportunity to address-

Mr. CULVER . . . I am a little surprised by the suggestion that any of my remarks, properly construed, could for a moment give rise to the slightest adverse reflection of commentary on the distinguished citizen of the State of Alabama. Outside of my state, I know of no state that I have a higher regard for.

Mr. ALLEN. I will make this statement: If the name of the State of Alabama is used in a disparaging fashion by any members of the Senate, whether he be a proponent or an opponent of these treaties, the senator from Alabama will feel that it is his duty and his responsibility to do everything within his power to defeat these treaties. That has not been his feeling up to his point. But the references in an unfavorable way to the State of Alabama, and using the State of Alabama in an unfavorable analogy, as the senator from Alabama sees it, must not be committed . . .

Mr. SPARKMAN. I want to say to my distinguished colleage from Alabama, who said a few minutes ago felt surely I would feel the same way that he did, of course, I do not know we can compare feelings, but I do want to say this in all frankness: When the distinguished senator here was speaking I found myself wondering how in the world that presentation was relevant. I just failed to see the connection . . .

Mr. CULVER. I am a little bit in the eye of the storm on this Mr. Leader, and I do think, in fairness to the two very able and distinguished senators from the State of Alabama as well as the collective institution of the U.S. Senate itself, that I should formally state that if anyone construed or interpreted my remarks as being an inappropriate or unfair reflection on the people individually of that state or that state as a whole that, of course, I would apologize. I certainly did not intend that . . .