Middlesex County Probate Judge Lawrence T. Perera will review his decision on the divorce case of Sen. Edward W. Brooke (R-Mass.) and his wife Remigia at a June 7 hearing here.The case will be reviewed because Brooke "may not have made a true and complete disclosure of his financial condition."

Brooke is also expected to appear before the Senate Ethics Committee on June 8 to discuss his failure to list a $47,000 personal loan - a violation of the Senate code of ethnics which requires disclosure of all loans over $2,500.

Brooke told a jammed press conference in Boston last Friday, he made a mistake and a misstatement" about the loan, which he testified in a May 12, 1977, court deposition had come from liquor wholesaler Raymond Tye, a personal friend.

Only $2,000 had come from Tye, he admitted in response to a Boston Globe investigation. The rest of the money was given to him by his now deceased mother-in-law, Theresa Ferrari-Sacacco.

He said he made the false statement because "I did not want to bring the private matter of the family out at the time."

He said he made the false statement because "I did not want to bring the private matter of the family out at the time."

Judge Perera's order, issued Tuesday, suspends his Dec. 15, 1977 decision granting the Brookes' divorce, which had been set to take effect on June 15.

The judge said he took the action on his own to determine whether the settlement is fair and reasonable "in light of the information which has come to the attention of the court."

Judge Perera ordered Brooke to bring to court all of his documents and notes relating to his personal finances "to permit the court to reconsider its judgment and take such other action as may be appropriate."

The judge could decide to void the divorce decree, rule the senator's false testimony has no effect on the divorce or he could refer the case for criminal prosecution, said Middlesex County District Attorney John Droney, Brooke's Democratic opponent in the 1972 Senate race.

Brooke's attorney, Robert F. McGrath, was quoted as saying the judge would either "let the judgment stand, which is what I expect he will do, or order further hearings."

Sen. Brooke, who is up for re-election, said his "statement" does not constitute perjury which is a violation of Massachusetts law.