For the second time in two weeks, President Carter has been portrayed by a Third World leader as "an honest person" beset by advisers who are misguided on African policy.

"I believe in President Carter. He's an honest person," Tanzanian President Julius Nyerere said in a television interview broadcast yesterday.

"But," Nyerere said in a comment similar to one last week by Cuban President Fidel Castro, "there is this competition about superpowers and there are voices in his administration who would like to see this confrontation in Africa, who would like to [show] the Soviet Union that they are not being soft."

Nyerere said the "voices," which he also described as "hysterical," are telling Carter that Africa is an area where the United States "can prove this toughness to the Soviet Union."

"This we don't like," the African leader said.

The Carter aide who has drawn most of the fire from Third World leaders on African policy is national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski. Castro last week denounced him as "a man with a lot of prejudice" who also is "irresponsible, adventuristic and . . . a liar."

Nyerere was more circumspect. Asked if he specifically meant Brzezinski in his "voices" comment, he said: "Well, I believe his interpretation of what the Soviet Union is up to in Africa . . . about how they got involved in Angola, is wrong."

The Tanzanian president said the Soviets and the Cubans are working in places like Angola because they have been invited by African governments. He said the invitations were issued because Western powers, "including the United States and South Africa," have been working to undermine Angola's Marxist government.

"When these causes are gone, there is no reason why the Cubans should remain" in Africa, Nyerere said.

Partly prompted by criticisms, Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance said last week that the United States and South Africa," have been working to undermine Angola's Marxist government.

"When these causes are gone, there is no reason why the Cubans should remain" in Africa, Nyerere said.

Partly prompted by criticisms, Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance said last week that the United States is willing to work with the present Angolan government "in more normal ways." The administration subsequently dispatched a senior diplomat from the U. S. mission to the United Nations to Angola for talks with President Agostinho Neto.

Nyerere said on "Issues and Answers" (ABC, WJLA) yesterday he is "very pleased" that the Carter administration "has found it possible to want to establish some kind of normal relationship with the government of Angola."

For his part, Carter has publicly accepted responsibility for U.S. policy on Africa, and he has defended Brzezinski.

"I don't think it's fair, and it's certainly not right . . . to jump on Dr. Brzezinski when I'm the one who shapes the policy after getting advice from him and others," the president said Friday in a speech in Fort Worth.