One of the most interesting chapters in the social history of America has been the decline in prejudice toward persons of different races and religions during recent decades. Further evidence that American society is becoming more tolerant can be seen in the trend of expressed attitudes on interracial and interfaith marraiges during the last 10 years.

Between 1968 and today the proportion of Americans who say the approve of marriages between whites and nonwhites has grown from 20 to 36 percent, while those approving of marriage between Catholics and Protestants has increased from 60 to 73 percent. And in the case of marriage between Jews and non-Jews, the percentage has risen from 50 percent in 1968 to 69 percent today.

he sharpest change in terms of growing tolerance is recorded in the case of marriage between whites and nonwhites, as seeen in the table below:

[TABLE OMMITED]

In the current survey, nonwhites ar found to be twice as likely as whites to express approval interracial marriages

[TABLE OMMITED]

The proportion who approve of marriages between Catholics and Protestants has increased 10 percent points in the decade between 1968 and 1978, from 63 to 73 percent. Since 1972, however attitudes on this question have remained virtually unchanged.

[TABLE OMMITED]

oday, as in the previous surveys, Catholics are most inclined to approve of Catholic-Protestants marriages than are Protestants. In the lastest survey 80 percent of Catholics and 68 percent of Protestants approved as seen below:

[TABLE OMMITED]

A similiar pattern is found in terms of attitudes toward marriage between Jews and non-Jews, with the approval rate up 10 points in a decade and with the sharpest change having occured between 1968 and 1972 as seen below:

[TABLE OMMITED]

The small number of Jews in the sample does not warrant presentation of the results for Jews in percentages. However among those are included, opinion closely matches overall national opinion.