In a gesture of defiance toward the Soviet Union, Romania's President Nicolae Ceausescu has put on record his country's refusal to agree to a proposal for increased defense spending by the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact.

During a long speech explaining Romania's stand at last week's Moscow summit meeting of alliance leaders, Ceausescu also revealed that he had refused to sign several documents proposed by the Soviets. One of these docuements is known to have been a condemnation of the Middle East peace talks between Israel and Egypt. A second, which is still secret, is believed by Western diplomats to havenvisaged an increase in the Soviet bloc's defense budget to meet what the Kremlin regards as a new threat posed by China.

Over the last few months, there has been evidence of attempts by the Soviet Union to secure military support from its East European allies, including Romania, in its quarrel with China. In a speech last month, Ceausescu went out of his way to insist that the Warsaw Pact should remain purely defensive in nature and be limited to a European framework.

While there has been no public suggestion yet that Moscow wants its allies to contribute directly to the 43 divisions of Soviet troops believed to be stationed along the Sino-Soviet border, an increase in the Warsaw Pact's military presence in Europe would clearly release Soviet troops for the Far East.

In his speech to workers' delegations in the Romanian capital of Bucharest on Saturday evening, Ceausescu said that neither he nor his delegation had signed any document at the Moscow summit other than the vaguely worded joint declaration and communique issued after the two-day meeting. He said he was making this public in order to avoid "rumors" about what had been decided in Moscow.

Then, in what foreign diplomats believe is an indication of the nature of the documents he refused to sign, he added: "We said in Moscow that it would be a big mistake if we were to pursue a policy of increasing military expenditures, a policy of the intensification of rearmament."

"We are convinced there is no imminent danger of war and no special measures are required at present," he said in the speech, which was published by the official Romanian news agency Agerpres.

Ceausescu, who drew harsh Soviet criticism for playing host to Chinese leader Hua Kuo-feng this summer, has consistently differed with the Kremlin over relations with China. While Soviet leaders have been describing China as more active foreign policy as threat to world peace. Ceausescu has been playing the "China card" in a bid to strengthen Romania's freedom of action.

Ceausecu's public defiance of Soviet pressure at the Warsaw Pact Summit culminates several months of diplomatic shadow boxing in Eastern Europe rellowing Hua's trip to Romania and Yugoslavia. In an apparent attempt to persuade the Romanian leader to change his mind. Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko made a three-day visit to Bucharest in mid-October.

Two weeks ago, Ceausecus flew to Yugoslavia for talks with his neighbor and political mentor. President Tito, the first communist party leader to defy the Soviet Union. Their talks were interpreted as a demonstration of Yugoslav support for the stand Romania was preparing to take in Moscow.

Yugoslav newspapers have been carrying reports from their usually well informed Moscow correspondents describing attempts by the Soviet Union to reassert control over its East European allies and make the Warsaw Pact move unified. Senior Yugoslav officials have even warned of efforts to revise the results of the 1976 Berlin Conference, which formally recognized the equality and independence of all communist countries.

Then, in what foreign diplomats believe is an indication of the nature of the documents he refused to sign, he added: "We said in Moscow that it would be a big mistake if we were to pursue a policy of increasing military expenditures, a policy of the intensification of rearmament."

"We are convinced there is no imminent danger of war and no special measures are required at present," he said in the speech, which was published by the official Romanian news agency Agerpriess.

Ceausescu, who drew harsh Soviet criticism for playing host to Chinese leader Kua Kuo-feng this summer, has consistently differed with the Kremlin over relations with China. While Soviet leaders have been describing China more active foreign policy as a threat to world peace, Ceausescu has been playing the "China card" in a bid to strengthen Romania's freedom of action.

Ceausescus public defiance of Soviet pressure at the Warsaw Pact Summit culminates several months of diplomatic shadow boxing in Eastern Europe following Hua's trip to Romania and Yugoslavia. In an apparent attempt to persuade the Romanian leader to change his mind. Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko made a three-visit to Bucharest in mid-October.

Two weeks ago, Ceausescu flew to Yugoslavia for talks with his neighbor and political mentor. President Tito, the first communist party leader to defy the Soviet Union. Their talks were interpreted as a stand Romania was preparing to take in Moscow.

Yugoslav newspapers have been carrying reports form their usually well inform [WORD ILLEGIBLE] describing attempts by the Soviet Union to reassert control over its East European allies and make the Warsaw Pact more unified. Senior Yugoslav officials have even warned of efforts to revise the results of the 1976 Berlin Conference, which formally recognized the equality and independence of all communist countries.

Another argument advanced by Ceausescu against any increase in Romania's $923 million defense budget is that this could lower the country's standard of living. Ceausescu, who has been in power for the last 13 years, has had to defuse popular discontent with what probably is the lowest living standard in Eastern Europe.

Other Soviet bloc leaders, notably Poland's Edward Gierek, have similar domestic preoccupations that would make them reluctant to agree to any increase in defense spending. A senior Foreign Ministry official in Bugaria, long the most docile of the Kremlin's allies, recently stressed to a visiting Western correspondent that money set aside for armements should be spent on increasing the country's standard of living. But he added "By playing the China card the West has increased the anxiety of the Warsaw Pact."

Similar sentiments have been expressed recently by senior Soviet officials who have talked about the need to counter any increase in the Chinese threat.

What was not clear from Ceausescus' speech is the extent to which his now open rebellion against the proposal to increase defense spending was supported by the leaders of other Soviet allies. In an indication that it had at least tacit support from some other countries, the Romanian Communist Party newspaper Scinteia said in a commentary Friday that Romania could not agree to proposals that did not have full support from all Warsaw Pact members.