A Senate official said yesterday that expense vouchers filed in 1973 and 1974 by Sen. Herman E. Talmadge (D-Ga.) were turned over Tuesday to a federal grand jury here that has been looking into Talmadge's financial affairs.

Included with the Senate vouchers was a March 26, 1974, payment to Talmadge for $2,289.99. The payment was for illegal expense claims and ended up in a secret bank account here set up for Talmadge by his former aide, Daniel Minchew. Minchew and Talmadge have accused each other of financial wrongdoing in connection with the account; each has denied the other's allegation.

Senate Secretary J. Stanley Kimmitt said yesterday that the grand jury subpoena for the records he received earlier this month gave no indication whether the federal panel was directing its attention toward Talmadge or Minchew.

Talmadge, meanwhile, flew in an Air Force jet early yesterday from Maryland to California, where he entered the alcohol treatment center at Long Beach Naval Regional Medical Center. On Monday Talmadge was admitted to Bethesda Naval Hospital suffering from what he described as exhaustion and alcohol abuse.

His press ecretary, Gordon Roberts, who accompanied Talmadge on the midnight flight to the West Coast, said yesterday that the move was made con the advice of his [talmadge's] physician and with the senator's full agreement and approval."

A Georgia newspaper reported that during his two-day stay at Bethesda, Talmadge was visited by former representative Wilbur Mills (D-Ark.), a reformed alcoholic who gave up is chairmanship of the House Ways and Means Committee in 1974. Mills told the newspaper that Talmadge had sworn off drinking.

Roberts said medical experts at Long Beach indicated that the normal treatment period at the center is four to six weeks. If Talmadge stays the full period, he would be out about the time the Senate Ethics Committee seeks to begin a trial-like hearing on allegations against him.

Roberts said medical experts at Long Beach indicated that the normal treatment period at the center is four to six weeks. If Talmadge stays the full period, he would be out about the time the Senate Ethics Committee seeks to begin a trial-like hearing on allegations against him.

Roberts said no decision has been made by the Georgia Democrat to ask for a delay of the hearing because no date has been set. "If they set one tomorrow or next week we'd probably ask for a delay," Roberts said.

The committee, whose investigation is separate from the grand jury's, has focused its probe on Talmadge.

In an interview yesterday, former senator Sam Ervin (D-N.C.) said he wrote to the committee asking that Talmadge be found guilty of wrongdoing only if the evidence against him was "beyond a reasonable doubt."

Ervin said he was asked to write by Talmadge's attorney, James Hamilton, a former counsel to Ervin's Senate Watergate Committee. "He asked what standard of proof I felt should be used," Ervin said, "and I told him that since I understood the charges were criminal in nature I thought the proof ought to be beyond a reasonable doubt."