A picture in the Sept. 17 issue of Time magazine, purporting to show a "Soviet-built intelligence station in Cuba," actually depicts a facility put up in 1957 -- before the Castro regime -- by International Telephone & Telegraph.

"That facility has been used ever since it was built for telephone communication between Cuba and the U.S. and an occasional television show," and an ITT spokesman here, laughing at what he called "Time's goof."

Time's picture editor, Arnold Drapkin, said the color photograph "came from a nongovernment source and we checked it with the best authorities in the field."

Asked whether the authorities were in government in the communications industry or in intelligence works, Drapkin declined further comment.

But the ITT spokesman, Bernard Goodrich, said that even a superficial examination of the equipment in the photograph shows that it could not be used for the purpose Time reported.

The caption says the photograph, which helped illustrate Time's cover story, "The Storm Over Cuba," shows "a section of an advanced electronics monitoring complex atop a limestone hill east of Havana. Facing north and east, the large antennas eavesdrop on U.S. and international civilian, military and space satellite electronic and voice messages and picture relays."

Goodrich said the station was build in 1957 by the Cuban Radio Co., then an ITT subsidiary, which has since been taken over by the government.

He noted that the station's dish-like antennae are fixed, which means they cannot follow and eavesdrop on moving communications satellites as Time alleged. CAPTION: PICTURE, A SOVIET-BUILT INTELLIGENCE STATION IN CUBA. This exclusive photograph, obtained by TIME, shows a section of an advanced electronics monitoring complex atop a limestone hill east of Havana. Facing north and east, the large antennas eavesdrop on U.S. and international civilian, military and space satellite electronic and voice messages and picture relays. Copyright (c) Time Magazine