The foreign ministers of West Germany, Britain and France held an unannounced meeting here. Thursday night reportedly to coordinate positions on a number of pressing international issues, including the situation in Poland and European relations with the new Reagan administration.

The meeting which was said to have lasted several hours, was confirmed today, although little more than the fact that it had taken place was revealed in the apparently coordinated statements provided by foreign policy spokesmen in three major West European countries involved.

Karl Paschke, the Bonn Foreign Ministry spokesman, said he had not known of the meeting until Friday night and could not explain the reason for its secrecy. He noted, however, that the ministers -- West Germany's Hans-Dietrich Genscher, France's Jean Francois-Poncet and Britain's Lord Carrington -- get along easily and informally with one another, and he cautioned against interpreting the session as particularly unusual.

Significantly, the meeting was timed as each of the ministers prepares to leave for a wide range of trips outside Europe, including nearly back-to-back visits by all three to Washington with in the month. A spokesman for the British Foreign Office said the meeting "provided useful opportunity for consulations before departing for trips abroad."

In recent months West European governments have been more assertive in pursuing foreign policies -- toward the Middle East, Third World and Soviet Union -- that sometimes conflict with Washington's positions.

In recent months West European governments have been more assertive in pursuing foreign policies -- toward the Middle East, Third World and Soviet Union -- that sometimes conflict with Washington's positions.

One notable exception to this has been the Western response to Poland. Acting on a consensus among the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's members last December that Soviet intervention in Poland would mean the end of East-West detente, European and American officials have carried out extensive consultations to coordinate likely responses should the Polish situation worsen.

But it is unlikely that Thursday's meetinng was a sign of heightened European concern about Poland.

The Bonn government at least does not regard a Soviet invasion as imminent, and takes as encouraging the installment of the new premier in Warsaw and the recent compromises between Polish authorities and Solidarity, the independent labor federation, all of which it is hoped here will provide a period of relative calm in Poland.

At the same time, the Western allies are reported to have drawn up a list of diplomatic, economic and military plans covering a wide range of contingencies in Poland, from a Polish police crackdown on Solidarity to a full-scale Soviet invasion.

Those familiar with the planning are reluctant to discuss the process for fear of compounding the pressurers already at work in Poland. Chancellor Helmut Schmidt is said by aides to believe that NATO has gone as far as it can or should with December's statement. A U.S. source described discussions within the alliance so far as consisting of working papers rather than speecific programs.

"There has been a great reluctance to commit things to paper because of the danger of leaks," this source said. However, another american source said the West Europeans had done considerable "homework" on the steps they would take in the event of a turn for the worse in Poland.

Despite persistent doubts in Europe and the United States about West Germany's commitment in particular to possible sanctions, knowledgeable U.S. sources say the Bonn government, which has the greatest investment in cooperative ties with Moscow, has indicated its intention not to break NATO ranks.