The American wife of Soviet hunger striker Yuri Balovlenkov said today that she had tricked her husband into giving up his fast by telling him that he would be allowed to emigrate to the United States.

The end of Balovlenkov's 36-day fast appeared to mark a victory for the Soviet authorities, who have insisted that they will not give in to pressure to allow the emigration of Soviet citizens whose spouses live in the West. There was a sudden upsurge of hunger strikes here after the successful protest late last year by dissident physicist Andrei Sakharov on behalf of his young ward.

Sakharov's ward, Liza Alexeyeva, and at least one hunger striker were allowed to leave the Soviet Union--but the Soviet authorities then abruptly decided to take a tougher course. At the beginning of July, foreign correspondents were called to a press conference and told that no other protester would be given an exit visa.

The Balovlenkov case developed into a test of wills between the Kremlin and him over the right of divided families to be reunited. He accused the Soviet authorities of reneging on a promise to allow him to leave following an earlier 43-day hunger strike in June.

In a telephone interview, Balovlenkov's wife, Elena, said she had deliberately lied to her husband in order to save his life. She told him that Soviet emigration officials had agreed to let him leave the country provided he ended his hunger strike--when in fact they made no such promise.

Mrs. Balovlenkov, 29, a nurse from Baltimore, arrived in Moscow last Friday from the United States. She met with Soviet officials today to plead her husband's case but was told that "state considerations" prevented granting him a visa.

Mrs. Balovlenkov said, however, that she was still hopeful that the authorities might relent.

"Now that he has stopped his protest, I hope that they might be more compassionate and give him permission to leave. They can say that they are doing this for humanitarian reasons and are not giving way to pressure," she said. Hunger Strike Ends After Wife's Trick By Michael Dobbs Washington Post Foreign Service

MOSCOW, Aug. 9--The American wife of Soviet hunger striker Yuri Balovlenkov said today that she had tricked her husband into giving up his fast by telling him that he would be allowed to emigrate to the United States.

The end of Balovlenkov's 36-day fast appeared to mark a victory for the Soviet authorities, who have insisted that they will not give in to pressure to allow the emigration of Soviet citizens whose spouses live in the West. There was a sudden upsurge of hunger strikes here after the successful protest late last year by dissident physicist Andrei Sakharov on behalf of his young ward.

Sakharov's ward, Liza Alexeyeva, and at least one hunger striker were allowed to leave the Soviet Union--but the Soviet authorities then abruptly decided to take a tougher course. At the beginning of July, foreign correspondents were called to a press conference and told that no other protester would be given an exit visa.

The Balovlenkov case developed into a test of wills between the Kremlin and him over the right of divided families to be reunited. He accused the Soviet authorities of reneging on a promise to allow him to leave following an earlier 43-day hunger strike in June.

In a telephone interview, Balovlenkov's wife, Elena, said she had deliberately lied to her husband in order to save his life. She told him that Soviet emigration officials had agreed to let him leave the country provided he ended his hunger strike--when in fact they made no such promise.

Mrs. Balovlenkov, 29, a nurse from Baltimore, arrived in Moscow last Friday from the United States. She met with Soviet officials today to plead her husband's case but was told that "state considerations" prevented granting him a visa.

Mrs. Balovlenkov said, however, that she was still hopeful that the authorities might relent.

"Now that he has stopped his protest, I hope that they might be more compassionate and give him permission to leave. They can say that they are doing this for humanitarian reasons and are not giving way to pressure," she said.