The Reagan administration yesterday intensified its vigorous lobbying effort to push the controversial MX missile through the lame-duck Congress.

More than 40 members of Congress trooped to the White House to hear a personal pitch by President Reagan on behalf of the nuclear weapon, which is a centerpiece of his five-year, $1.6 trillion military buildup program.

Reagan also sent a letter to all House members yesterday emphasizing "the absolute necessity of modernizing the Triad so that we can restore the strategic balance and maintain effective deterrence." The Triad is the three-pronged U.S. strategic nuclear force of airborne, sea-based and land-based missiles.

"We must move forward with the MX to have any hope of achieving meaningful progress at the arms negotiations in Geneva," Reagan added. "History shows that unilateral restraints by the United States have not led to arms reductions by our adversaries."

According to Rep. James K. Coyne (R-Pa.), the president reminded one group of congressmen yesterday of today's anniversary of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.

Coyne said Reagan told them that "the Japanese were emboldened to attempt their attack on Pearl Harbor because the United States lacked an effective deterrent. The president said the vote on MX will be a test as to whether or not we have the resolve to prevent that happening again."

However, both sides predicted an extremely close vote today on an amendment sponsored by Rep. Joseph P. Addabbo (D-N.Y.) to cut $988 million in production funds for the missile out of the fiscal 1983 budget. Total funding for the MX this year would amount to $3.5 billion, including research and development funds that would not be affected by the Addabbo amendment.

The administration wants to base 100 intercontinental MX missiles in super-hardened underground silos in a deployment plan known as "Dense Pack" near Cheyenne, Wyo. Opponents of the plan, however, question whether Dense Pack will be any less vulnerable to Soviet attack than other plans, including former president Carter's discredited "Race Track" scheme, an attempt to hide the MX deployment by moving it around huge underground railroad tracks in Utah and Nevada.

Rep. Jim Leach of Iowa, one of 46 Republicans to vote against the MX in the defense authorization bill in July, called the Dense Pack proposal "so awesomely dumb that even Congress will turn down this public works project for the cement industry."

The silos for the missiles must be hardened with steel and cement to withstand pressures between 15,000 and 45,000 pounds per square inch, as compared to the 2,000 pounds per square inch that Minuteman silos are now built to withstand.

Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, national security affairs adviser William P. Clark and arms control negotiator Edward L. Rowny addressed a meeting attended by most House Republicans yesterday.

Emerging from the meeting, Weinberger said he told the lawmakers that the MX "is not just a desire to have one more piece of hardware, but an absolutely essential part of the maintenance of our deterrence."

Some administration supporters, however, were pessimistic. Rep. Jack Edwards (R-Ala.), a leader of the pro-MX forces, said congressmen in the meeting raised the question of "whether the secretary had given the American people enough information so they can understand fully what it is we'll be called on to do this week. I guess many of us feel that the secretary probably has not done a good job there."

Opponents of the MX, which would eventually cost an estimated $35 billion for 100 missiles that would carry 10 warheads each, appear more organized now than in July, when an effort led by Rep. Nicholas Mavroules (D-Mass.) to cut the funds failed 209 to 212.

Yesterday afternoon the opponents, who include environmental, religious and arms Administration Steps Up Lobbying for MX By Margot Hornblower and Juan Williams Washington Post Staff Writers

The Reagan administration yesterday intensified its vigorous lobbying effort to push the controversial MX missile through the lame-duck Congress.

More than 40 members of Congress trooped to the White House to hear a personal pitch by President Reagan on behalf of the nuclear weapon, which is a centerpiece of his five-year, $1.6 trillion military buildup program.

Reagan also sent a letter to all House members yesterday emphasizing "the absolute necessity of modernizing the Triad so that we can restore the strategic balance and maintain effective deterrence." The Triad is the three-pronged U.S. strategic nuclear force of airborne, sea-based and land-based missiles.

"We must move forward with the MX to have any hope of achieving meaningful progress at the arms negotiations in Geneva," Reagan added. "History shows that unilateral restraints by the United States have not led to arms reductions by our adversaries."

According to Rep. James K. Coyne (R-Pa.), the president reminded one group of congressmen yesterday of today's anniversary of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.

Coyne said Reagan told them that "the Japanese were emboldened to attempt their attack on Pearl Harbor because the United States lacked an effective deterrent. The president said the vote on MX will be a test as to whether or not we have the resolve to prevent that happening again."

However, both sides predicted an extremely close vote today on an amendment sponsored by Rep. Joseph P. Addabbo (D-N.Y.) to cut $988 million in production funds for the missile out of the fiscal 1983 budget. Total funding for the MX this year would amount to $3.5 billion, including research and development funds that would not be affected by the Addabbo amendment.

The administration wants to base 100 intercontinental MX missiles in super-hardened underground silos in a deployment plan known as "Dense Pack" near Cheyenne, Wyo. Opponents of the plan, however, question whether Dense Pack will be any less vulnerable to Soviet attack than other plans, including former president Carter's discredited "Race Track" scheme, an attempt to hide the MX deployment by moving it around huge underground railroad tracks in Utah and Nevada.

Rep. Jim Leach of Iowa, one of 46 Republicans to vote against the MX in the defense authorization bill in July, called the Dense Pack proposal "so awesomely dumb that even Congress will turn down this public works project for the cement industry."

The silos for the missiles must be hardened with steel and cement to withstand pressures between 15,000 and 45,000 pounds per square inch, as compared to the 2,000 pounds per square inch that Minuteman silos are now built to withstand.

Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger, national security affairs adviser William P. Clark and arms control negotiator Edward L. Rowny addressed a meeting attended by most House Republicans yesterday.

Emerging from the meeting, Weinberger said he told the lawmakers that the MX "is not just a desire to have one more piece of hardware, but an absolutely essential part of the maintenance of our deterrence."

Some administration supporters, however, were pessimistic. Rep. Jack Edwards (R-Ala.), a leader of the pro-MX forces, said congressmen in the meeting raised the question of "whether the secretary had given the American people enough information so they can understand fully what it is we'll be called on to do this week. I guess many of us feel that the secretary probably has not done a good job there."

Opponents of the MX, which would eventually cost an estimated $35 billion for 100 missiles that would carry 10 warheads each, appear more organized now than in July, when an effort led by Rep. Nicholas Mavroules (D-Mass.) to cut the funds failed 209 to 212.

Yesterday afternoon the opponents, who include environmental, religious and arms control groups, had a head count showing the Addabbo amendment winning by a dozen votes, with 30 members undecided.

However, Mavroules, an MX opponent, recalled the White House's successful last-minute lobbying on his July amendment, as well as on the nuclear freeze resolution this year. He said, "I'm not counting my chickens."

Rep. Norman D. Dicks (D-Wash.), another leader of the anti-MX forces, said, "We have a shot at this thing. We're picking up a number of Republicans and southern Democrats who feel there's no sense in producing the missile until we have a basing mode that's more credible than Dense Pack."

He added, however, that "The White House has a lot of things they can do to twist arms if they need four or five votes and it is pretty hard to stop them."

House Democratic leaders have frequently criticized the size of the president's defense budget, which was pared from $248 billion to $231 billion by the House Appropriations Committee, on the grounds that it is the principal cause of large deficits that they say are damaging the economy.

"The White House is working like hell," said Rep. Silvio O. Conte (R-Mass.), an MX opponent.

"It's going to be close. The MX is like a prizefighter in a 10-round fight who has been jabbed in the jaw every round. It doesn't take much of an uppercut to knock it out." control groups, had a head count showing the Addabbo amendment winning by a dozen votes, with 30 members undecided.

However, Mavroules, an MX opponent, recalled the White House's successful last-minute lobbying on his July amendment, as well as on the nuclear freeze resolution this year. He said, "I'm not counting my chickens."

Rep. Norman D. Dicks (D-Wash.), another leader of the anti-MX forces, said, "We have a shot at this thing. We're picking up a number of Republicans and southern Democrats who feel there's no sense in producing the missile until we have a basing mode that's more credible than Dense Pack."

He added, however, that "The White House has a lot of things they can do to twist arms if they need four or five votes and it is pretty hard to stop them."

House Democratic leaders have frequently criticized the size of the president's defense budget, which was pared from $248 billion to $231 billion by the House Appropriations Committee, on the grounds that it is the principal cause of large deficits that they say are damaging the economy.

"The White House is working like hell," said Rep. Silvio O. Conte (R-Mass.), an MX opponent.

"It's going to be close. The MX is like a prizefighter in a 10-round fight who has been jabbed in the jaw every round. It doesn't take much of an uppercut to knock it out."