In testimony before the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians, Japanese Americans described discrimination against them :

Thomas Kinaga, a member of the all-Japanese American 442d Infantry Regiment: "I remember how I spent my last furlough before our regiment went overseas. I went to see my family in Heart Mountain Wyoming . There I was for two weeks locked up behind barbed wire in spite of my uniform. I heard many derisive comments by my friends about my status, and even I could see the irony of it all."

Kiyoo Yamashita, who had owned and skippered a prosperous Tuna clipper before the war, after his release from internment camp: "I was forced to accept a very low position as a servant. It is a source of bitter memories to recall how my oldest son, a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army, had to come through the back door, the servants' entrance, to visit us when he returned from overseas."

Tatsu Hori received this letter from his employer terminating his job because of his Japanese ancestry: "Dear Mr. Hori. The company regrets exceedingly the action this morning, however, you are acquainted with the circumstances . . . . Your contribution to our efforts was substantial and the quality of your work was outstanding. If you should require a letter of recommendation in seeking employment elsewhere, please do not hesitate to ask me for it. Lots of Luck. Yours Very Truly. Ernest Schlieben."

Mabel Ota: "I worked as a clerk in the fingerprint and identification bureau of the Los Angeles Police Department until the war burst upon us. Then the police decided it was inconvenient to have a Japanese working in their department and had me transferred to the Jefferson Branch library for a six weeks' assignment and then terminated my assignment without cause. When I read and heard rumors that all Japanese would be interned, I couldn't believe it. I kept saying that I was a loyal American citizen and that it just couldn't happen in a democracy."

Alice Nehira: "When the directive was issued for all Orientals of Japanese descent to report for either deportation or relocation, many of my father's close friends felt angered and betrayed. None of them had committed any crime, but were being ordered to sell their belongings and were herded into far-away camps."

William Kochiyama: "I tried to enlist in the armed forces, first with the Army, then the Navy, and finally the Marines. At each recruiting station, I was thrown out on my ear. No Japs were wanted." Despite His Army Uniform, One Soldier On Leave Was Confined to Wyoming Camp

In testimony before the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians, Japanese Americans described discrimination against them:

Thomas Kinaga, a member of the all-Japanese American 442d Infantry Regiment: "I remember how I spent my last furlough before our regiment went overseas. I went to see my family in Heart Mountain Wyoming . There I was for two weeks locked up behind barbed wire in spite of my uniform. I heard many derisive comments by my friends about my status, and even I could see the irony of it all."

Kiyoo Yamashita, who had owned and skippered a prosperous Tuna clipper before the war, after his release from internment camp: "I was forced to accept a very low position as a servant. It is a source of bitter memories to recall how my oldest son, a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army, had to come through the back door, the servants' entrance, to visit us when he returned from overseas."

Tatsu Hori received this letter from his employer terminating his job because of his Japanese ancestry: "Dear Mr. Hori. The company regrets exceedingly the action this morning, however, you are acquainted with the circumstances . . . . Your contribution to our efforts was substantial and the quality of your work was outstanding. If you should require a letter of recommendation in seeking employment elsewhere, please do not hesitate to ask me for it. Lots of Luck. Yours Very Truly. Ernest Schlieben."

Mabel Ota: "I worked as a clerk in the fingerprint and identification bureau of the Los Angeles Police Department until the war burst upon us. Then the police decided it was inconvenient to have a Japanese working in their department and had me transferred to the Jefferson Branch library for a six weeks' assignment and then terminated my assignment without cause. When I read and heard rumors that all Japanese would be interned, I couldn't believe it. I kept saying that I was a loyal American citizen and that it just couldn't happen in a democracy."

Alice Nehira: "When the directive was issued for all Orientals of Japanese descent to report for either deportation or relocation, many of my father's close friends felt angered and betrayed. None of them had committed any crime, but were being ordered to sell their belongings and were herded into far-away camps."

William Kochiyama: "I tried to enlist in the armed forces, first with the Army, then the Navy, and finally the Marines. At each recruiting station, I was thrown out on my ear. No Japs were wanted."