Hardly a week goes by that I do not see something in the newspaper or on television news about this problem. It has to do, in a very real way, with the education of our children and the future of this country. Simply put, we do not have enough teachers in our schools to teach either math or science classes. . . .

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the demand for scientists and engineers to fill science and engineering occupations will increase by 40 percent between 1978 and 1990. Projections indicate that 180,000 new jobs will be available in the mathematical and physical and life sciences, while about 480,000 will be created in the computer professions, and 250,000 in engineering--with the computer profession expected to experience the most rapid growth in demand.

Who is going to fill these jobs? How can we possibly expect to meet this demand if we do not do something to improve the math and science competency of our high school graduates? How are we going to do that without teachers qualified to teach them? . . .

This country has a problem. We are living in a world that demands individuals who can deal with a sophisticated level of technology and problems we could never have dreamed of 10 to 20 years ago. How can we presume a future of growth and prosperity, let alone just surviving without making the investment necessary to insure that future? Without the commitment to make the investment, we will become the authors of our own fate--a fate that threatens not just our entire economic future but our national security as well.