Any governor and any assembly in any era must face a range of dilemmas, urgent and continuous, great and small. And we cannot allow these problems to preoccupy our attention to the exclusion of the great issues, the transcendent questions, that none of us can possibly solve alone, but that each of us . . . must necessarily face. The great issues of our time, like those of (the late Gov.) Colgate Darden's, ultimately are resolved in the common theme that for so long has inspired the imagination of those who have led Virginia--the dream of creating a brighter, more abundant future as an enduring legacy to those who will follow.

That dream in our time, like every great dream in any time, must begin with the facts that are reality. For us, that reality is the new and different nature of the current national recession. Our present economic problems are more than simply another phase in the traditional business cycle; they contain elements of a fundamental economic transformation taking place in the economies of the commonwealth, the nation and the world. For us, this means that while traditional manufacturing and industrial diversity will continue to sustain our basic economy, real growth must come from the developing enterprises in new technology.

In Virginia, two recent examples vividly illustrate the point. In mid-1982, Firestone reduced its tire operations in Hopewell, and 500 Virginians lost their jobs. At the same time, IBM expanded its computer chip operations in Prince William County and created 1,000 new jobs. The message, I think, is clear: we must master change, or be mastered by it. . . .