The D.C. City Council, reversing a vote it took two weeks ago, agreed yesterday to postpone this fall's scheduled election of more than 300 Advisory Neighborhood Commission members until next year.

The council's action on the ANC, subject to a final vote in two weeks, was the latest development in the city government's effort to reach consensus on whether to hold any scheduled elections this year, including those for the school board and a citizens' initiative on preserving historic Rhodes Tavern.

The council already has agreed to delay until next year the election of three city-paid lobbyists who would work to persuade Congress to grant statehood for the District. That action was unchanged by yesterday's vote.

The council's switch on the election of the ANC members, who each represent about 2,000 residents and are consulted by the city government on neighborhood concerns, came after strong lobbying by Mayor Marion Barry to reverse the vote of two weeks ago.

But for the second session in a row, Barry and Council Chairman David A. Clarke failed to get support to postpone all scheduled 1983 elections. The delay had been sought as part of an overall plan to consolidate elections and give the city's troubled elections board time to clear up administrative disarray.

The elections board has had continuing trouble in assembling an accurate list of registered voters, resulting in widespread confusion at the polls in some recent elections.

Council member John A. Wilson (D-Ward 2), leader of the effort to hold the elections as scheduled, assailed the council's vote, contending that Barry could easily order a cleanup of the city's elections records by fall.

"Everything in this city works if certain people want it to work," Wilson said. "If this city isn't prepared to hold elections, then the city ought to find somebody who can."

Wilson, in a rare public criticism of another council member, rebuked William R. Spaulding (D-Ward 5), longtime chairman of the government operations committee, "who for eight years has not done a single bit of oversight on the Board of Elections and Ethics."

Council member Polly Shackleton (D-Ward 3), one of three members to abandon previous support for holding the ANC balloting this year as scheduled, said, "There could be nothing worse for our status with the Congress . . . than the fact that we cannot guarantee a good election."

At issue was not only the elections board's logistical ability to hold the election, but also new boundaries for ANC districts that were recently approved by the council. The elections board argued that it needed more time to certify the new districts.

There are now 367 Advisory Neighborhood Commission members. With the new districts, which reflect shrinkage in the District's population, there will be fewer ANC members, probably slightly more than 300.

The ANC delay was approved on a 9-to-4 roll call vote. The three council members who switched their votes on the issue were Shackleton, Wilhelmina J. Rolark (D-Ward 8) and Nadine P. Winter (D-Ward 6).

Also voting to put off the elections were H.R. Crawford (D-Ward 7), who did not vote two weeks ago; Charlene Drew Jarvis (D-Ward 4), Jerry A. Moore Jr. (R-At Large), Frank Smith (D-Ward 1), William R. Spaulding (D-Ward 5) and John Ray (D-At Large).

Voting to hold the ANC elections were Clarke, Wilson, Betty Ann Kane (D-At Large) and Hilda Mason (Statehood-At Large).

In other action, the council approved legislation to require Mayor Marion Barry to use a sliding fee scale, based on ability to pay, for services at the city's health clinics. Barry had proposed steep increases in the fees as part of an effort to cover costs and receive higher reimbursements from the federal government. D.C. Council Votes to Delay Elections for ANC Until 1984 By Tom Sherwood Washington Post Staff Writer

The D.C. City Council, reversing a vote it took two weeks ago, agreed yesterday to postpone this fall's scheduled election of more than 300 Advisory Neighborhood Commission members until next year.

The council's action on the ANC, subject to a final vote in two weeks, was the latest development in the city government's effort to reach consensus on whether to hold any scheduled elections this year, including those for the school board and a citizens' initiative on preserving historic Rhodes Tavern.

The council already has agreed to delay until next year the election of three city-paid lobbyists who would work to persuade Congress to grant statehood for the District. That action was unchanged by yesterday's vote.

The council's switch on the election of the ANC members, who each represent about 2,000 residents and are consulted by the city government on neighborhood concerns, came after strong lobbying by Mayor Marion Barry to reverse the vote of two weeks ago.

But for the second session in a row, Barry and Council Chairman David A. Clarke failed to get support to postpone all scheduled 1983 elections. The delay had been sought as part of an overall plan to consolidate elections and give the city's troubled elections board time to clear up administrative disarray.

The elections board has had continuing trouble in assembling an accurate list of registered voters, resulting in widespread confusion at the polls in some recent elections.

Council member John A. Wilson (D-Ward 2), leader of the effort to hold the elections as scheduled, assailed the council's vote, contending that Barry could easily order a cleanup of the city's elections records by fall.

"Everything in this city works if certain people want it to work," Wilson said. "If this city isn't prepared to hold elections, then the city ought to find somebody who can."

Wilson, in a rare public criticism of another council member, rebuked William R. Spaulding (D-Ward 5), longtime chairman of the government operations committee, "who for eight years has not done a single bit of oversight on the Board of Elections and Ethics."

Council member Polly Shackleton (D-Ward 3), one of three members to abandon previous support for holding the ANC balloting this year as scheduled, said, "There could be nothing worse for our status with the Congress . . . than the fact that we cannot guarantee a good election."

At issue was not only the elections board's logistical ability to hold the election, but also new boundaries for ANC districts that were recently approved by the council. The elections board argued that it needed more time to certify the new districts.

There are now 367 Advisory Neighborhood Commission members. With the new districts, which reflect shrinkage in the District's population, there will be fewer ANC members, probably slightly more than 300.

The ANC delay was approved on a 9-to-4 roll call vote. The three council members who switched their votes on the issue were Shackleton, Wilhelmina J. Rolark (D-Ward 8) and Nadine P. Winter (D-Ward 6).

Also voting to put off the elections were H.R. Crawford (D-Ward 7), who did not vote two weeks ago; Charlene Drew Jarvis (D-Ward 4), Jerry A. Moore Jr. (R-At Large), Frank Smith (D-Ward 1), William R. Spaulding (D-Ward 5) and John Ray (D-At Large).

Voting to hold the ANC elections were Clarke, Wilson, Betty Ann Kane (D-At Large) and Hilda Mason (Statehood-At Large).

In other action, the council approved legislation to require Mayor Marion Barry to use a sliding fee scale, based on ability to pay, for services at the city's health clinics. Barry had proposed steep increases in the fees as part of an effort to cover costs and receive higher reimbursements from the federal government.