House-Senate conferees agreed last night to give senators a $9,100 annual pay raise but to limit their outside earnings from speech-making to $20,940, as they neared approval of a final omnibus appropriations bill for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30.

Under heavy Senate pressure, they also agreed to drop a House-proposed moratorium on leasing of federally owned coal and provided instead for creation of a commission to examine the controversial leasing practices of Interior Secretary James G. Watt.

In contention when the conferees recessed until today was President Reagan's request for $50 million in additional military assistance for El Salvador, $8.5 billion for the International Monetary Fund and spending for various social welfare programs, including $225 million for health insurance for the unemployed.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Mark O. Hatfield (R-Ore.) said compromise proposals for Salvadoran aid ranged from $15 million to $40 million. Earlier, the Senate had voted to give Reagan his full request, while the House had denied all of it.

Under threat of a veto, conferees trimmed about $1 billion in Senate-proposed spending and loan authority to which Reagan had objected, although some big-ticket items remain to be resolved. Among items dropped were about $400 million in rural water and sewer loans, farm ownership loans and soil conservation.

In abandoning the coal-leasing moratorium, conferees also avoided what Sen. James A. McClure (R-Idaho) described as another almost certain veto pitfall, although for a time they leaned toward taking the risk.

"Jim Watt can do a lot of damage in the time you're waiting" for a commission report, complained Sen. Dale Bumpers (D-Ark.) in trying to prod the House to stand firm for a moratorium.

Passage of the spending bill is viewed as urgent because it includes funds to continue payment for food stamps, which otherwise will expire by Aug. 1. The government has sent out warnings to states, which some fear could jeopardize full payments at the start of next month.

Approval of senators' new pay levels and honorarium limits came after an abortive attempt by Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) to have the honorarium ceiling raised to $30,000. The House politely but firmly quashed that.

The increase would raise senators' annual pay from $60,662.50 to $69,800, which House members approved for themselves last year. At that time, however, senators refused the pay raise and chose earning unlimited income from speech-making.

In the meantime, a furor broke out over senators' huge outside earnings from speeches, prompting the House to try imposing a limit on senators' moonlighting. The Senate finally agreed to a limit equivalent to 30 percent of salary and later voted to take the same pay raise taken by the House the year before. But it insisted on delaying the honorarium limit to next January, which the House agreed to in conference.

Conferees also agreed to appointment of a consulting architect to oversee restoration of the West Front of the Capitol. The Senate had insisted on the appointment because Capitol Architect George White long has advocated extending the West Front. Both houses had ended the long debate about how to repair the crumbling front in favor of restoration, not extension. Hill Conferees Agree on Senate Pay Raise By Helen Dewar Washington Post Staff Writer

House-Senate conferees agreed last night to give senators a $9,100 annual pay raise but to limit their outside earnings from speech-making to $20,940, as they neared approval of a final omnibus appropriations bill for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30.

Under heavy Senate pressure, they also agreed to drop a House-proposed moratorium on leasing of federally owned coal and provided instead for creation of a commission to examine the controversial leasing practices of Interior Secretary James G. Watt.

In contention when the conferees recessed until today was President Reagan's request for $50 million in additional military assistance for El Salvador, $8.5 billion for the International Monetary Fund and spending for various social welfare programs, including $225 million for health insurance for the unemployed.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Mark O. Hatfield (R-Ore.) said compromise proposals for Salvadoran aid ranged from $15 million to $40 million. Earlier, the Senate had voted to give Reagan his full request, while the House had denied all of it.

Under threat of a veto, conferees trimmed about $1 billion in Senate-proposed spending and loan authority to which Reagan had objected, although some big-ticket items remain to be resolved. Among items dropped were about $400 million in rural water and sewer loans, farm ownership loans and soil conservation.

In abandoning the coal-leasing moratorium, conferees also avoided what Sen. James A. McClure (R-Idaho) described as another almost certain veto pitfall, although for a time they leaned toward taking the risk.

"Jim Watt can do a lot of damage in the time you're waiting" for a commission report, complained Sen. Dale Bumpers (D-Ark.) in trying to prod the House to stand firm for a moratorium.

Passage of the spending bill is viewed as urgent because it includes funds to continue payment for food stamps, which otherwise will expire by Aug. 1. The government has sent out warnings to states, which some fear could jeopardize full payments at the start of next month.

Approval of senators' new pay levels and honorarium limits came after an abortive attempt by Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) to have the honorarium ceiling raised to $30,000. The House politely but firmly quashed that.

The increase would raise senators' annual pay from $60,662.50 to $69,800, which House members approved for themselves last year. At that time, however, senators refused the pay raise and chose earning unlimited income from speech-making.

In the meantime, a furor broke out over senators' huge outside earnings from speeches, prompting the House to try imposing a limit on senators' moonlighting. The Senate finally agreed to a limit equivalent to 30 percent of salary and later voted to take the same pay raise taken by the House the year before. But it insisted on delaying the honorarium limit to next January, which the House agreed to in conference.

Conferees also agreed to appointment of a consulting architect to oversee restoration of the West Front of the Capitol. The Senate had insisted on the appointment because Capitol Architect George White long has advocated extending the West Front. Both houses had ended the long debate about how to repair the crumbling front in favor of restoration, not extension.