State Sen. Tommie Broadwater Jr. (D-Prince George's), who scrapped his way up from poverty to become the leading black politician in suburban Washington, was convicted today, along with his daughter and three other codefendants, of concocting an elaborate scheme to launder $70,000 in illicitly obtained food stamps through Broadwater's supermarket in Fairmount Heights.

The often flamboyant Broadwater showed little emotion in a packed and hushed federal courtroom here as jury foreman Robert E. McCoy of Bethesda announced the guilty verdicts on all counts shortly after noon today. Broadwater and his daughter Jacqueline, 21, left the courtroom immediately by a back elevator, refusing to talk to reporters, and sped from the courthouse basement garage in his 1979 burgundy Cadillac El Dorado.

The conviction, which came after 10 days of often-conflicting testimony, throws both Broadwater's political future and business career into doubt.

Under the Maryland Constitution, he faces automatic suspension from the Senate without pay when he is sentenced, probably in late September. If he does not appeal, or if the conviction is upheld on appeal, he will be expelled from the legislature. If his conviction is reversed, he could be reinstated. Defense attorney Edward P. Camus said a decision on whether to appeal has not been made.

As a convicted felon subject to a possible prison sentence, Broadwater also faces potential problems maintaining several businesses he operates, including his financially troubled supermarket, a bail bond agency and a service station, all in Prince George's County.

At the Ebony Inn, a bar coowned by Broadwater across the street from his supermarket, customer Dorothy Crawford called the verdict "nothing but politics," summing up the reaction of Broadwater supporters there.

His conviction marks the first time a sitting member of the Maryland General Assembly has been convicted of a serious crime since June 1977, when George Santoni, a delegate from Baltimore, was convicted of federal extortion charges. Santoni was sentenced to six years and served four.

Then-governor Marvin Mandel was convicted on Aug. 23, 1977, of federal charges of mail fraud and racketeering. Mandel served 19 months in a federal prison before his four-year sentence was commuted by President Reagan. Mandel's predecessor, Spiro T. Agnew, resigned as vice president on Oct. 10, 1973, after pleading no contest to one count of income tax evasion, in which he was charged with failing to report $29,500 in income in 1967, when he was governor. Upon his resignation and plea, the Justice Department dropped charges of bribery, conspiracy and violation of tax laws against Agnew.

Broadwater, convicted of one count of conspiracy and four counts of illicitly obtaining food stamps, faces a maximum of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine on each count. If imprisoned, court observers said, he probably will be ordered to serve the terms concurrently and is thus not likely to be sentenced to more than five years.

U.S. District Court Judge Norman P. Ramsey, who presided at the trial, indicated that Broadwater and the other defendants will be sentenced in 50 to 55 days. All defendants remained free on bond today.

The jury of eight women and four men left the courthouse in a group and refused to talk to reporters about their six hours of deliberations. The jurors, drawn from throughout Maryland, ranged from a Gaithersburg elementary school teacher to a Baltimore library clerk. Their ages ranged from 20 to 61, according to court records. One of the 12 was black, the others white.

Throughout the two-week trial, Broadwater and his daughter proclaimed their innocence, denying charges that they cashed thousands of dollars of purportedly stolen food stamps through his Chapel Oaks Farmers Market in Fairmount Heights and fabricated financial records at Codefendants Convicted Broadwater Guilty in Plot By Paul W. Valentine Washington Post Staff Writer

BALTIMORE, July 29--State Sen. Tommie Broadwater Jr. (D-Prince George's), who scrapped his way up from poverty to become the leading black politician in suburban Washington, was convicted today, along with his daughter and three other codefendants, of concocting an elaborate scheme to launder $70,000 in illicitly obtained food stamps through Broadwater's supermarket in Fairmount Heights.

The often flamboyant Broadwater showed little emotion in a packed and hushed federal courtroom here as jury foreman Robert E. McCoy of Bethesda announced the guilty verdicts on all counts shortly after noon today. Broadwater and his daughter Jacqueline, 21, left the courtroom immediately by a back elevator, refusing to talk to reporters, and sped from the courthouse basement garage in his 1979 burgundy Cadillac El Dorado.

The conviction, which came after 10 days of often-conflicting testimony, throws both Broadwater's political future and business career into doubt.

Under the Maryland Constitution, he faces automatic suspension from the Senate without pay when he is sentenced, probably in late September. If he does not appeal, or if the conviction is upheld on appeal, he will be expelled from the legislature. If his conviction is reversed, he could be reinstated. Defense attorney Edward P. Camus said a decision on whether to appeal has not been made.

As a convicted felon subject to a possible prison sentence, Broadwater also faces potential problems maintaining several businesses he operates, including his financially troubled supermarket, a bail bond agency and a service station, all in Prince George's County.

At the Ebony Inn, a bar coowned by Broadwater across the street from his supermarket, customer Dorothy Crawford called the verdict "nothing but politics," summing up the reaction of Broadwater supporters there.

His conviction marks the first time a sitting member of the Maryland General Assembly has been convicted of a serious crime since June 1977, when George Santoni, a delegate from Baltimore, was convicted of federal extortion charges. Santoni was sentenced to six years and served four.

Then-governor Marvin Mandel was convicted on Aug. 23, 1977, of federal charges of mail fraud and racketeering. Mandel served 19 months in a federal prison before his four-year sentence was commuted by President Reagan. Mandel's predecessor, Spiro T. Agnew, resigned as vice president on Oct. 10, 1973, after pleading no contest to one count of income tax evasion, in which he was charged with failing to report $29,500 in income in 1967, when he was governor. Upon his resignation and plea, the Justice Department dropped charges of bribery, conspiracy and violation of tax laws against Agnew.

Broadwater, convicted of one count of conspiracy and four counts of illicitly obtaining food stamps, faces a maximum of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine on each count. If imprisoned, court observers said, he probably will be ordered to serve the terms concurrently and is thus not likely to be sentenced to more than five years.

U.S. District Court Judge Norman P. Ramsey, who presided at the trial, indicated that Broadwater and the other defendants will be sentenced in 50 to 55 days. All defendants remained free on bond today.

The jury of eight women and four men left the courthouse in a group and refused to talk to reporters about their six hours of deliberations. The jurors, drawn from throughout Maryland, ranged from a Gaithersburg elementary school teacher to a Baltimore library clerk. Their ages ranged from 20 to 61, according to court records. One of the 12 was black, the others white.

Throughout the two-week trial, Broadwater and his daughter proclaimed their innocence, denying charges that they cashed thousands of dollars of purportedly stolen food stamps through his Chapel Oaks Farmers Market in Fairmount Heights and fabricated financial records at the store to cover the operation.

The other three defendants--Maryland cab driver William Dudley, 49, Washington funeral home owner Raymond (Big Jack) Quigley Sr., 68, and his son, Raymond Jr., 49--were convicted of buying $70,000 in marked food stamps from an undercover Secret Service agent at 40 percent of their face value and funneling them through Broadwater's market for redemption at full value.

Dudley and the two Quigleys acknowledged that they became involved in food stamp transactions with the undercover agent, Norman James, but contended they were illegally entrapped, lured with promises of huge profits by James.

Federal prosecutor James P. Ulwick branded the entrapment defense "baloney," telling the jury in final arguments Thursday that the three men were already involved in illicit activity before agents learned of it. They were "ripping off the food stamp system, and to hell with the poor people," Ulwick said.

As outlined by Ulwick, the Quigleys had been using the largely defunct Malvan-Schey funeral home in Northwest Washington as a trading center for stolen food stamps.

Tipped to their activity by an informer, undercover agent James testified that, posing as a food stamp thief, he contacted the Quigleys and arranged several small-scale sales of stamps to them late last year. In an effort to find where the Quigleys resold the stamps and how they were ultimately redeemed with the government, James said he negotiated four larger transactions totalling $70,000 in marked stamps with the Quigleys and a middleman, who turned out to be Dudley, the cab driver.

Other Secret Service agents, using sophisticated electronic tracking equipment, testified they trailed Dudley in his cab as he carried the marked food stamps to Broadwater's home and supermarket.

Agents acknowledged they never saw a direct hand-off of the stamps from Dudley to Broadwater, but they produced records showing that the bulk of the stamps were processed through Broadwater's market, endorsed with the market's stamp and forwarded to the Federal Reserve Bank in Baltimore for cash redemption.

Ulwick contended that Broadwater masterminded the process and directed daughter Jacqueline to fabricate cash register tapes and daily ledger sheets to make it look as if the stamps were used at the market by ordinary customers.

Tommie Broadwater and Dudley were arrested March 6 at Broadwater's legislative office in Hyattsville when Dudley was making a delivery of $25,000 in stamps, the last of the four transactions, according to the government.

Taking the witness stand in his own defense, Broadwater acknowledged Dudley attempted to sell him the stamps, but Broadwater said he refused and ordered Dudley to leave the office.

Jacqueline Broadwater denied falsifying market records, saying she was only carrying out routine bookkeeping chores.

Defense attorney Camus said he has not decided yet whether to appeal. "It's too soon," he said. "He Broadwater wants to be with his family and comfort his daughter right now."

Dudley, a soft-voiced man in a rumpled suit, sat quietly in the courthouse lobby with his wife, Gwendolyn.

"Good guys never win," he said, "unless they're wearing a white hat, and I guess I wasn't wearing a white hat."