Attorneys for former auto maker John Z. De Lorean, laying out his defense against charges of drug trafficking, said he was framed, entrapped, lied to, conspired against and possibly burglarized by federal officials with a "prurient" interest in his family affairs.

A huge collection of new documents in federal court here also reveal that, although the government recorded more than 100 video and audio tapes of De Lorean, 58, allegedly discussing cocaine and heroin deals, federal prosecutors have no tape recording of the key first meeting as reported by a government informer.

In a detailed government account of De Lorean's initial involvement in the alleged drug scheme filed in court here for the first time, one Drug Enforcement Administration document said that informer James Timothy Hoffman called De Lorean "for a social reason" sometime before July 6, 1982. In the course of the conversation, De Lorean allegedly said that he "wanted to meet and discuss an important matter and could not do so over the phone."

At a July 11 meeting at the Marriott Hotel in Newport Beach, Calif., Hoffman said, according to the document, that De Lorean "wanted to invest up to $2 million in 'China white,' " a form of heroin, to raise money for his failing sports car company.

The meeting was not recorded, DEA agent John M. Valestra reported, "because at this time De Lorean was not a DEA target." Hoffman offered to help, and gave De Lorean the name of a banker, actually an undercover FBI agent, who could verify that Hoffman had successfully handled large amounts of cash.

De Lorean checked with the phony banker and told Hoffman to "go ahead with our proposition," according to the court papers. About $15 to $25 million worth of cocaine, not heroin, eventually was acquired.

The documents also say that Hoffman, expected to testify at De Lorean's trial, has moved to a "distant location in the United States" and received a new identity under the federal witness protection program.

Declarations, investigation reports, motions and counter motions totaling more than 600 pages provide several new details in the celebrated case and give the clearest indication so far of how De Lorean plans to defend himself against charges carrying a maximum penalty of $195,000 and 72 years in prison.

De Lorean's attorneys will have to contend with a government case buttressed by motion pictures and audio tapes of what the government describes as De Lorean actively negotiating to finance cocaine and heroin sales in the United States.

According to the documents, De Lorean's attorneys are preparing to argue in court that:

* Hoffman lied about De Lorean first approaching him for a drug-trafficking deal.

* De Lorean "expressed his intention to withdraw" from the deal in one taped conversation a month before his Oct. 19 arrest, leading Hoffman and government agents to devise a new scheme to entrap him in a crime. De Lorean has said that Hoffman threatened the lives of De Lorean's two children if he backed out, although the government has told the defense that they have no record of such a conversation.

* William Morgan Hetrick, a pilot who has pleaded guilty to drug charges, and was arrested as a De Lorean accomplice, may have been cooperating with federal agents to ensnare De Lorean before his arrest.

* The charge that De Lorean was involved in a drug conspiracy ending on Oct. 19 is invalid because his alleged co-conspirators, Hetrick and drug-runner Stephen Lee Arrington, were arrested on Oct. 18, leaving no one for De Lorean to conspire with on Oct. 19.

* Hetrick may have disclosed De Lorean's defense strategy to federal prosecutors when he was sharing a private investigator with De Lorean while secretly plea-bargaining with the government.

* Federal investigators, including one DEA agent accused of selling government information in another case, may have illegally entered the home of Hetrick's sons, "Jinx" and "Buzz," to gather evidence. Defense attorneys also have mentioned unspecified break-ins at De Lorean properties.

* U.S. and British officials may have interferred with De Lorean's search for legitimate investors in his Northern Ireland-based automobile company, forcing him to consider the drug deal.

De Lorean was told this week that he was barred from seeing most portions of his DEA file because they were "classified pursuant to executive order in the interest of national defense and foreign policy." There was no explanation of how the case related to national security.

In several statements filed with U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi, Assistant U.S. Attorneys James P. Walsh Jr. and Layn R. Phillips have denied De Lorean's charges and noted that his attorneys have provided little if any evidence to back them up.

De Lorean attorney Howard L. Weitzman has objected to a federal request to see a diary kept by De Lorean's wife Cristina shortly after his arrest. The diary, portions of which were published in People magazine, "may provide some prurient appeal to government lawyers and agents," but have "nothing to do with the merits of this case," De Lorean's lawyers said.

The documents show that De Lorean's defense team is focusing on Hoffman, a former aircraft salesman who once worked for Hetrick and knew De Lorean when they were neighbors in northern San Diego County. Hetrick became a paid government informer after pleading guilty in another case. information in another case, may have illegally entered the home of Hetrick's sons, "Jinx" and "Buzz," to gather evidence. Defense attorneys also have mentioned unspecified break-ins at De Lorean properties.

U.S. and British officials may have interferred with De Lorean's search for legitimate investors in his Northern Ireland-based automobile company, forcing him to consider the drug deal.

De Lorean was told this week that he was barred from seeing most portions of his DEA file because they were "classified pursuant to executive order in the interest of national defense and foreign policy." There was no explanation of how the case related to national security.

In several statements filed with U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi, Assistant U.S. Attorneys James P. Walsh Jr. and Layn R. Phillips have denied De Lorean's charges and noted that his attorneys have provided little if any evidence to back them up.

De Lorean attorney Howard L. Weitzman has objected to a federal request to see a diary kept by De Lorean's wife Cristina shortly after his arrest. The diary, portions of which were published in People magazine, "may provide some prurient appeal to government lawyers and agents," but have "nothing to do with the merits of this case," De Lorean's lawyers said.

The documents show that De Lorean's defense team is focusing on Hoffman, a former aircraft salesman who once worked for Hetrick and knew De Lorean when they were neighbors in northern San Diego County. Hetrick became a paid government informer after pleading guilty in another case.