An advisory committee to the Anne Arundel County Board of Education today recommended a major expansion of the use of computers as teaching aids, urging that every elementary school classroom, including kindergartens, be equipped with small personal computers and that teachers at all grade levels and in all studies be trained to use them.

The county's 74 elementary schools each now have one or two Commodore computers but could get up to 10 times that number if the recommendations are adopted. The group, the Ad Hoc Advisory Committee for Computer Education Programs, also recommended nearly doubling the numbers of computers in each junior, middle and high school.

Just how quickly the school system could implement the recommendations is unknown, but the proposals have the support of the school system's computer education program coordinator, Judy Mauriello.

The recommendations, which would be subject to funding approval from the school board and then the County Council, call for each of 13 county high schools to be equipped with as many as 13 more small computers and each of 17 junior and middle schools to be alloted 12 more. High schools are now equipped with 20 microcomputers--all them Apple home computers--and junior and middle schools have eight.

The schools use them primarily for math studies, but the advisory committee would like to see computers used for a full range of studies, including social sciences, music, art and other subjects.

The cost of each machine could range anywhere from $500 for the elementary school models to $2,000 for the more sophisticated microcomputers used in high schools. Neither the committee nor the school budget office could say how much the total computer proposal would cost. But there is no money in this school year's budget for additional computers, budget officials said.

The report is in line with the county school systems' new emphasis on integrating computers into the classroom, Mauriello said.

"We're hoping our kids will . . . be computer literate," she said, " . . . able to use them for their own purposes, be it work or personal, and be aware of the impact of computers in society."

A year ago, Anne Arundel schools became the first in Maryland to put computers in elementary classrooms, Mauriello said. In line with the new recommendations, a social studies program will be introduced on computers systemwide this year, she said.

The curriculum suggested in the report calls for familiarizing elementary school students with microcomputers and their keyboards, teaching programming and uses of computers to junior high-level students and advanced and employment skills to high school students.

The school board today also agreed to require an additional math class and "academic" class for students entering the ninth grade this month. The board approved increasing the total academic requirements to 22, two more than required by the state of Maryland, earlier this year. but was sharply divided on whether to follow school Superintendent Edward J. Anderson's recommendation to require the courses to be an additional mathematics class and "academic" class. Use More Computers In Schools, Panel Urges in Anne Arundel By Kaye Thompson Special to The Washington Post

ANNAPOLIS, Sept. 7--An advisory committee to the Anne Arundel County Board of Education today recommended a major expansion of the use of computers as teaching aids, urging that every elementary school classroom, including kindergartens, be equipped with small personal computers and that teachers at all grade levels and in all studies be trained to use them.

The county's 74 elementary schools each now have one or two Commodore computers but could get up to 10 times that number if the recommendations are adopted. The group, the Ad Hoc Advisory Committee for Computer Education Programs, also recommended nearly doubling the numbers of computers in each junior, middle and high school.

Just how quickly the school system could implement the recommendations is unknown, but the proposals have the support of the school system's computer education program coordinator, Judy Mauriello.

The recommendations, which would be subject to funding approval from the school board and then the County Council, call for each of 13 county high schools to be equipped with as many as 13 more small computers and each of 17 junior and middle schools to be alloted 12 more. High schools are now equipped with 20 microcomputers--all them Apple home computers--and junior and middle schools have eight.

The schools use them primarily for math studies, but the advisory committee would like to see computers used for a full range of studies, including social sciences, music, art and other subjects.

The cost of each machine could range anywhere from $500 for the elementary school models to $2,000 for the more sophisticated microcomputers used in high schools. Neither the committee nor the school budget office could say how much the total computer proposal would cost. But there is no money in this school year's budget for additional computers, budget officials said.

The report is in line with the county school systems' new emphasis on integrating computers into the classroom, Mauriello said.

"We're hoping our kids will . . . be computer literate," she said, " . . . able to use them for their own purposes, be it work or personal, and be aware of the impact of computers in society."

A year ago, Anne Arundel schools became the first in Maryland to put computers in elementary classrooms, Mauriello said. In line with the new recommendations, a social studies program will be introduced on computers systemwide this year, she said.

The curriculum suggested in the report calls for familiarizing elementary school students with microcomputers and their keyboards, teaching programming and uses of computers to junior high-level students and advanced and employment skills to high school students.

The school board today also agreed to require an additional math class and "academic" class for students entering the ninth grade this month. The board approved increasing the total academic requirements to 22, two more than required by the state of Maryland, earlier this year. but was sharply divided on whether to follow school Superintendent Edward J. Anderson's recommendation to require the courses to be an additional mathematics class and "academic" class.