* March 1969 -- Rhodes Tavern, Union Station and eight other buildings are placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

* November 1977 -- Developer Oliver T. Carr proposes to build a shopping-hotel-office complex at the 15th and F streets NW site.

* March 1978 -- The U.S. Commission of Fine Arts recommends that Carr be allowed to tear down Rhodes Tavern, but that he spare two other landmark structures in the same block: the Keith-Albee Theater Building and the Metropolitan Bank Building. Carr says he is willing to preserve the three buildings if the funds can be raised to offset his losses.

* April 1978 -- The Citizens Committee to Save Historic Rhodes Tavern is formed. Joseph N. Grano Jr. and seven other people are its nucleus.

* May 1978 -- The District's State Historic Preservation officer orders a 180-day period of negotiations before any of the three landmark buildings at Carr's proposed complex can be demolished.

* June 1978 -- Carr proposes a one-year suspension in negotiations while the first phase of his project is begun.

* September 1978 -- Marion Barry, who had supported the tavern's preservation, wins the D.C. Democratic mayoral primary.

* July 1979 -- Carr tells the city he will preserve the facades of the Keith-Albee and Metropolitan Bank buildings if officials will agree to demolition of Rhodes Tavern.

* December 1979 -- Mayor Barry's office holds hearings on whether to issue a demolition permit. Carr signs an agreement with another preservationist group, the Committee to Preserve Rhodes Tavern, promising not to demolish the building until early 1981 to give the group time to raise money to move it.

* February 1980 -- The District government grants Carr a demolition permit. The Citizens Committee to Save Historic Rhodes Tavern plans a lawsuit to preserve it at the 15th and F streets NW site.

* September 1980 -- Grano quits his job as a government attorney to devote full time to blocking the tavern's demolition.

* May 1981 -- The D.C. Court of Appeals rejects the Rhodes Tavern committee's argument that the District government acted improperly in granting the permit.

* September 1981 -- Rhodes Tavern committee asks the Supreme Court to review the city's preservation law.

* November 1981 -- The Supreme Court refuses to intervene.

* July 1982 -- Mayor Barry, in a hotly fought reelection campaign, "reaffirms" his support for Rhodes Tavern's preservation. Grano files for a nonbinding, citywide initiative to save the tavern.

* February 1983 -- The Citizens Committee to Preserve Rhodes Tavern, announcing that plans to move the tavern have collapsed, urges incorporating the building into Metropolitan Square project.

* March 1983 -- The D.C. Board of Elections and Ethics, after receiving a petition signed by 25,000 voters, places an initiative on the November ballot that would make saving Rhodes Tavern a municipal policy and establish a board to seek ways to accomplish that goal.

* May 1983 -- The D.C. Zoning Board clears the way for issuing a new permit to demolish the building.

* August 1983 -- The Rhodes Tavern committee sues in U.S. District Court to stop the city from issuing a demolition permit to Carr until after vote on the initiative.

* September 1983 -- U.S. District Judge Thomas F. Flannery bars the city government from issuing a demolition permit until after the November elections.

* November 1983 -- Washington voters overwhelmingly approve initiative declaring it public policy to save the tavern. Carr and the city say they will try to have the initiative, set to take effect in March, thrown out in court.

* February 1984 -- The city and attorneys for Carr ask a U.S. District Court of Appeals panel to lift the federal court order banning the tavern's demolition.

* May 1984 -- The U.S. Court of Appeals vacates Flannery's order. With the court-ordered demolition ban set to expire June 4, the city says it will issue the required permit as soon as the court allows.

* June 1984 -- The ban on demolition expires, but Grano and other preservationists ask the U.S.Court of Appeals for a rehearing. The group also files suit in D.C. Superior Court, requesting that Mayor Barry be barred from issuing a demolition permit until the Rhodes Tavern advisory board decides the best way to save it. Barry announces seven nominations to serve on the board. D.C. Superior Court Judge Stephen Eilperin issues a temporary restraining order and then an injunction against demolishing the building until the lawsuit brought by the Rhodes Tavern committee is resolved.

* Aug. 20, 1984 -- D.C. Superior Court Judge John F. Doyle declares the Rhodes Tavern initiative unconstitutional but delays demolition seven days, pending an appeal.

* Aug. 22, 1984 -- Rhodes Tavern group asks D.C. Court of Appeals to block the lower court's ruling.

* Aug. 23, 1984 -- The D.C. Court of Appeals agrees to block the proposed demolition temporarily, pending a decision by the court on whether to hear arguments by preservationists.

* Aug. 30, 1984 -- The Appeals Court agrees to hear the preservationists' arguments, but only if the group can post a $100,000 bond with the court by Sept. 6.

* Sept. 5, 1984 -- The Rhodes Tavern group, failing to get the appeals court to reduce the bond, asks U.S. Supreme Court to intervene to block building's demolition.

* Sept. 6, 1984 -- Chief Justice Warren E. Burger refuses to grant a stay of the lower court order, clearing the way for the tavern's demolition.

* Sept. 7, 1984 -- The tavern gets a weekend reprieve after the appeals court judges fail to lift the injunction blocking the issuance of a demolition permit.

* Sept. 10, 1984 -- The D.C. Court of Appeals lifts the injunction on the demolition permit for Rhodes Tavern. As Grano and other committee members watch, the demolition of the 185-year-old building begins.