Republican Carol Schwartz, a former school board member, was the apparent winner last night in a close-fought contest for an at-large D.C. City Council seat, as District of Columbia voters turned out in record numbers to give Walter F. Mondale his only big, clear-cut electoral victory.

In final but unofficial returns, incumbent Democratic council member John Ray won the at-large race, as expected, with 45 percent of the vote. Schwartz followed with about 18 percent of the vote and Statehood Party candidate Josephine Butler trailed with about 15 percent.

About 14 percent of the early votes were write-ins, apparently reflecting incumbent council member Jerry A. Moore Jr.'s nonpartisan write-in campaign. But the total number of early write-in votes, based on a computer count, lagged well behind Schwartz's early total.

The D.C. Board of Elections and Ethics said it would take about 10 days to complete a manual count of the write-in votes, and officials may end up counting some write-ins that did not show up on the computer tally last night. Thus it will be more than a week before the outcome of the race is finally known, although Schwartz' lead was a formidable one.

Initiative 17, which would give homeless persons the right to adequate overnight shelter at taxpayer expense, was winning by a margin of better than 2 to 1, with about 72 percent of the vote in favor of the measure and about 28 percent against.

In the other council races, District voters reelected Democratic incumbents John Wilson (D-Ward 2), Charlene Drew Jarvis (D-Ward 4), H.R. Crawford (D-Ward 7) and Wilhelmina J. Rolark (D-Ward 8).

Mondale was winning in the District with an overwhelming 86 percent of the vote.

The D.C. Board of Elections and Ethics said yesterday's voter turnout was 208,418, representing 75.8 percent of the registered voters and topping the 1964 voter turnout record of 198,597.

Elections officials said that additional voting machines had to be sent to two precincts, one in Ward 2 and the other in Ward 6. Some poll workers reported that they were faced with lines when they opened the doors at 7 a.m. and that in some cases nearly half of the voters assigned to a precinct had voted by early afternoon.

At Lafayette School in Ward 3, 1,300 persons had voted by noon yesterday, compared to 780 who had voted by that same time in the 1980 presidential election. "I think it's going tremendously well," said Lewis Shollenberger, the precinct captain. "For this precinct, it's a record turnout."

The six-way race for two at-large council seats generated the most excitement as incumbent Moore (R-At Large) fought to retain his seat by waging his write-in campaign.

In the at-large council race, voters were able to cast ballots for two candidates. Incumbent Ray's easy victory was predicted, meaning that the real contest was between council member Moore, GOP nominee Schwartz, Statehood Party candidate Butler, independent Brian Moore and Communist Party candidate Maurice Jackson to be the voters' second choice.

Early returns showed that Brian Moore had about 6 percent of the vote and Jackson had less than 2 percent.

The at-large race produced some unusual alignments. Clifton Smith, an aide to Mayor Marion Barry, drove around the city making certain that Democrats supporting incumbent Moore, a Republican, were properly covering the key precincts. Democratic City Council Chairman David A. Clarke, wearing a Moore campaign hat, accompanied Moore to precincts. Some voters made it clear that they were not voting along party lines.

Ross Beatty, a Democrat, sported a Mondale-Ferraro button while handing out Schwartz's campaign literature. "There's no contradiction," said Beatty. "Carol Schwartz will keep the mayor in line . . . . She'll talk back to him, which is more than Dave Clarke will do."

Ann Heuer, chairman of the Schwartz Seen Council Winner D.C. Voters Give Mondale a Clear-Cut Electoral Victory By Marcia Slacum Greene Washington Post Staff Writer

Republican Carol Schwartz, a former school board member, was the apparent winner last night in a close-fought contest for an at-large D.C. City Council seat, as District of Columbia voters turned out in record numbers to give Walter F. Mondale his only big, clear-cut electoral victory.

In final but unofficial returns, incumbent Democratic council member John Ray won the at-large race, as expected, with 45 percent of the vote. Schwartz followed with about 18 percent of the vote and Statehood Party candidate Josephine Butler trailed with about 15 percent.

About 14 percent of the early votes were write-ins, apparently reflecting incumbent council member Jerry A. Moore Jr.'s nonpartisan write-in campaign. But the total number of early write-in votes, based on a computer count, lagged well behind Schwartz's early total.

The D.C. Board of Elections and Ethics said it would take about 10 days to complete a manual count of the write-in votes, and officials may end up counting some write-ins that did not show up on the computer tally last night. Thus it will be more than a week before the outcome of the race is finally known, although Schwartz' lead was a formidable one.

Initiative 17, which would give homeless persons the right to adequate overnight shelter at taxpayer expense, was winning by a margin of better than 2 to 1, with about 72 percent of the vote in favor of the measure and about 28 percent against.

In the other council races, District voters reelected Democratic incumbents John Wilson (D-Ward 2), Charlene Drew Jarvis (D-Ward 4), H.R. Crawford (D-Ward 7) and Wilhelmina J. Rolark (D-Ward 8).

Mondale was winning in the District with an overwhelming 86 percent of the vote.

The D.C. Board of Elections and Ethics said yesterday's voter turnout was 208,418, representing 75.8 percent of the registered voters and topping the 1964 voter turnout record of 198,597.

Elections officials said that additional voting machines had to be sent to two precincts, one in Ward 2 and the other in Ward 6. Some poll workers reported that they were faced with lines when they opened the doors at 7 a.m. and that in some cases nearly half of the voters assigned to a precinct had voted by early afternoon.

At Lafayette School in Ward 3, 1,300 persons had voted by noon yesterday, compared to 780 who had voted by that same time in the 1980 presidential election. "I think it's going tremendously well," said Lewis Shollenberger, the precinct captain. "For this precinct, it's a record turnout."

The six-way race for two at-large council seats generated the most excitement as incumbent Moore (R-At Large) fought to retain his seat by waging his write-in campaign.

In the at-large council race, voters were able to cast ballots for two candidates. Incumbent Ray's easy victory was predicted, meaning that the real contest was between council member Moore, GOP nominee Schwartz, Statehood Party candidate Butler, independent Brian Moore and Communist Party candidate Maurice Jackson to be the voters' second choice.

Early returns showed that Brian Moore had about 6 percent of the vote and Jackson had less than 2 percent.

The at-large race produced some unusual alignments. Clifton Smith, an aide to Mayor Marion Barry, drove around the city making certain that Democrats supporting incumbent Moore, a Republican, were properly covering the key precincts. Democratic City Council Chairman David A. Clarke, wearing a Moore campaign hat, accompanied Moore to precincts. Some voters made it clear that they were not voting along party lines.

Ross Beatty, a Democrat, sported a Mondale-Ferraro button while handing out Schwartz's campaign literature. "There's no contradiction," said Beatty. "Carol Schwartz will keep the mayor in line . . . . She'll talk back to him, which is more than Dave Clarke will do."

Ann Heuer, chairman of the D.C. Republican Party, said last night that Schwartz will bring the voice of the party to the council. "We're not any longer going to be a silent minority," she said. "We're going to be a very loud minority. We're going to speak our piece."

As the early returns were being counted, Clarke pledged to support Schwartz if she won: "We will work with Mrs. Schwartz as we did with Rev. Moore and we hope that she will work with us."

City Council member Betty Ann Kane (D-At-Large), who campaigned for Schwartz, said: "I supported two gutsy women -- Ferraro and Schwartz -- and at least one of them won."

D.C. Del. Walter E. Fauntroy ran unopposed for his eighth term as the District's nonvoting delegate to Congress.

Incumbent Moore, a GOP convention delegate who was labeled a Democrat in disguise by his primary opponents, launched a nonpartisan write-in campaign after losing the Republican nomination to Schwartz. Moore's critics immediately accused him of him of circumventing the party primary process by forcing another political encounter with Schwartz.

Moore, a 66-year-old Baptist minister and a 15-year council veteran, was backed in the general election by six Democratic City Council members, local ministers and members of Mayor Barry's powerful political organization.

Schwartz, 40, beat Moore in the primary with her promise to be a more genuine Republican voice on the council. But bowing to the realities of politics in Washington, she muted her partisan appeal in the general election and ran as a "breath of fresh air" needed on a council too reluctant to speak out against high taxes and in favor of better city services.

Schwartz, a two-term D.C. school board member from Ward 3, won the Republican nomination by carrying Wards 1, 2, 3 and 6, all of which have substantial concentrations of white, middle-class voters. The fact that Schwartz is white and Moore is black gave rise to speculation after the primary by Barry and Fauntroy, among others, that race was a factor in the challenger's victory.

District residents also voted yesterday on candidates seeking to represent 323 single-member districts, each consisting of about 2,000 voters, on the city's 37 Advisory Neighborhood Commissions (ANCs). Created in 1976, the ANCs advise the city government on neighborhood issues.