The post-election job shuffle has begun.

At the Health and Human Services Department, George Siguler, chief of staff to Secretary Margaret M. Heckler for nearly two years, is leaving Dec. 1 to take a job with private industry in Massachusetts. Siguler formerly was a financial executive at Harvard University.

John F. Scruggs, assistant secretary for legislation at HHS for the past year, will leave Jan. 1 to join a new Washington lobbying group formed by two former aides to retiring Senate Majority Leader Howard H. Baker Jr. (R-Tenn.), Martin Gold and Howard Liebengood, former sergeant-at-arms of the Senate. Rep. Ray Kogovsek (D-Colo.), who did not seek reelection, will join the firm when his term expires.

Others who have joined the firm or are expected to include William F. Hildenbrand, one of the best Republican Senate vote-counters in recent memory, who is retiring as secretary of the Senate, and Denise Bode, a former aide and counsel to Sen. David L. Boren (D-Okla.). Another possible recruit: Chuck Merin, former lobbyist for the National Association of Letter Carriers and the Tobacco Institute.

Over at the Social Security Administration, meanwhile, Acting Commissioner Martha A. McSteen yesterday picked Arthur F. Simermeyer to be acting deputy commissioner for systems, in charge of the giant SSA computer system and computer modernization plan. Former computer chief Marshall Mandell stepped down recently to go into private business. Ruth Pierce will move to Simermeyer's old job of associate commissioner of the Office of Central Operations, which issues Social Security cards and processes disability applications, among other things.

McSteen also has chosen Jane Ross, a career civil servant since 1980, to head the Office of Research and Statistics and International Policy, the agency's source for social statistics and analysis. Ross will replace Jack Carroll.Firing at GSA Upheld A Merit Systems Protection Board administrative law judge has ruled that the General Services Administration was within its rights when it fired whistle blower Bertrand G. Berube in August 1983. w0024 ----- r a BC-11/09/84-TRI 11-09 A25 The Federal Triangle Some Agency Workers Move Out, Others Up

The post-election job shuffle has begun.

At the Health and Human Services Department, George Siguler, chief of staff to Secretary Margaret M. Heckler for nearly two years, is leaving Dec. 1 to take a job with private industry in Massachusetts. Siguler formerly was a financial executive at Harvard University.

John F. Scruggs, assistant secretary for legislation at HHS for the past year, will leave Jan. 1 to join a new Washington lobbying group formed by two former aides to retiring Senate Majority Leader Howard H. Baker Jr. (R-Tenn.), Martin Gold and Howard Liebengood, former sergeant-at-arms of the Senate. Rep. Ray Kogovsek (D-Colo.), who did not seek reelection, will join the firm when his term expires.

Others who have joined the firm or are expected to include William F. Hildenbrand, one of the best Republican Senate vote-counters in recent memory, who is retiring as secretary of the Senate, and Denise Bode, a former aide and counsel to Sen. David L. Boren (D-Okla.). Another possible recruit: Chuck Merin, former lobbyist for the National Association of Letter Carriers and the Tobacco Institute.

Over at the Social Security Administration, meanwhile, Acting Commissioner Martha A. McSteen yesterday picked Arthur F. Simermeyer to be acting deputy commissioner for systems, in charge of the giant SSA computer system and computer modernization plan. Former computer chief Marshall Mandell stepped down recently to go into private business. Ruth Pierce will move to Simermeyer's old job of associate commissioner of the Office of Central Operations, which issues Social Security cards and processes disability applications, among other things.

McSteen also has chosen Jane Ross, a career civil servant since 1980, to head the Office of Research and Statistics and International Policy, the agency's source for social statistics and analysis. Ross will replace Jack Carroll.