Venezuelan President Jaime Lusinchi met with President Reagan yesterday to discuss the search for peace in Central America and said the crisis there cannot be solved by "force or military involvement."

Venezuela is one of the so-called Contadora countries -- together with Mexico, Colombia and Panama -- seeking to negotiate a peaceful resolution of the conflicts and tensions afflicting Central America.

A senior U.S. official who briefed reporters after the White House meeting said the discussions centered on the effort to work out a draft peace treaty acceptable to the various parties. The United States and some Central American countries have objected to language in earlier draft proposals that they contend would enable Nicaragua's leftist government to maintain dictatorial control and continue aiding insurgencies in neighboring countries.

There were reports that Lusinchi might present Reagan with new proposals from Nicaragua. However, the senior official, who declined to be identified, said the Venezuelean leader said nothing about such proposals in the meeting. In the face of repeated questions, the official insisted that he had no knowledge of "any phantom letter" from Nicaragua.

In his public arrival statement, Lusinchi used language that could be interpreted as critical of U.S. emphasis on military activity in El Salvador and support of "contra" guerrillas fighting the Sandinista government in Nicaragua.

"We do not believe that the solution to this delicate and complex crisis of the Central American countries can be one of force or military involvement . . . . The only lasting solution rests on designing and implementing a policy of democratization, pluralism, social justice and economic development," Lusinchi said.

Reagan, in his remarks, continued the administration's hard line toward Nicaragua. Venezuelan Chief, Reagan Confer Here Leaders Discuss Latin Peace Effort

Venezuelan President Jaime Lusinchi met with President Reagan yesterday to discuss the search for peace in Central America and said the crisis there cannot be solved by "force or military involvement."

Venezuela is one of the so-called Contadora countries -- together with Mexico, Colombia and Panama -- seeking to negotiate a peaceful resolution of the conflicts and tensions afflicting Central America.

A senior U.S. official who briefed reporters after the White House meeting said the discussions centered on the effort to work out a draft peace treaty acceptable to the various parties. The United States and some Central American countries have objected to language in earlier draft proposals that they contend would enable Nicaragua's leftist government to maintain dictatorial control and continue aiding insurgencies in neighboring countries.

There were reports that Lusinchi might present Reagan with new proposals from Nicaragua. However, the senior official, who declined to be identified, said the Venezuelean leader said nothing about such proposals in the meeting. In the face of repeated questions, the official insisted that he had no knowledge of "any phantom letter" from Nicaragua.

In his public arrival statement, Lusinchi used language that could be interpreted as critical of U.S. emphasis on military activity in El Salvador and support of "contra" guerrillas fighting the Sandinista government in Nicaragua.

"We do not believe that the solution to this delicate and complex crisis of the Central American countries can be one of force or military involvement . . . . The only lasting solution rests on designing and implementing a policy of democratization, pluralism, social justice and economic development," Lusinchi said.

Reagan, in his remarks, continued the administration's hard line toward Nicaragua.