The Reagan administration is considering evacuating the few U.S. Embassy personnel in Beirut if anti-American threats from Lebanese Shiite Moslem extremists pose a danger to their safety, U.S. officials said yesterday.

The officials stressed that the administration would prefer not to remove the embassy staff. They said that an end to official U.S. presence would be seen in the Middle East as a reversal of President Reagan's vow when he withdrew U.S. Marines from Beirut a year ago that the United States will not be driven out of Lebanon by extremist pressure.

However, the officials added, the potential effects on U.S. influence in the region must be balanced against the fact that three bomb attacks took a devastating toll of American lives in Beirut the past two years. The administration also does not want to risk repetition of the 1979-80 Iranian hostage crisis when Moslem extremists seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran.

Two U.S. warships, the aircraft carrier USS Eisenhower and the guided-missile cruiser USS Mississippi, have been dispatched to Mediterranean waters near Lebanon. But, the officials said, no decision has been made to evacuate the embassy.

The threats were precipitated by U.S. resistance to a U.N. Security Council resolution charging Israel with atrocities in southern Lebanon. The United States is trying, over objections of the Lebanese government, to sidetrack a council vote scheduled for Monday. If it fails, the United States is expected to veto the resolution.

That has resulted in threats from organizations of Shiite Moslems, the principal population group in southern Lebanon. The most extreme of these organizations, Hezballah, or the Party of God, and the Islamic Jihad, are heavily influenced by Iran and are believed to have been involved in attacks against Americans in Lebanon.

In April 1983, 17 Americans were killed in the bombing of the U.S. Embassy, 241 Marines with the multinational peacekeeping force were killed in an October 1983 blast at their quarters at Beirut airport and two Americans died in the bombing of a U.S. Embassy annex last September.

Although the number has been kept secret for security reasons, between 20 and 30 Americans are believed to be working under Ambassador Reginand Bartholomew at the heavily fortified embassy residence in East Beirut. They are the remnant of the sizable U.S. military and diplomatic presence that sprang up in 1982 when the administration regarded Lebanese President Amin Gemayel as a U.S. client.

The close U.S.-Lebanese relationship collapsed last year after Reagan pulled out the Marines in response to mounting domestic concern and Gemayel, unable to establish military superiority over dissident Lebanese factions, came under the influence of Syria.

However, the administration has felt it important to keep a diplomatic presence in Beirut to maintain a tie with the Gemayel government and to demonstrate that the United States cannot be deflected from its goals in the Middle East by terrorism.

A few days ago, the United Nations, responding to U.S. expressions of concern, pulled its American employes in southern Lebanon off the job. U.S. officials have estimated that about 1,400 American citizens live in Lebanon. They said that most have dual nationality or are married to Lebanese and have not expressed desire to leave the country. Administration Ponders Beirut Embassy Pullout By John M. Goshko Washington Post Staff Writer

The Reagan administration is considering evacuating the few U.S. Embassy personnel in Beirut if anti-American threats from Lebanese Shiite Moslem extremists pose a danger to their safety, U.S. officials said yesterday.

The officials stressed that the administration would prefer not to remove the embassy staff. They said that an end to official U.S. presence would be seen in the Middle East as a reversal of President Reagan's vow when he withdrew U.S. Marines from Beirut a year ago that the United States will not be driven out of Lebanon by extremist pressure.

However, the officials added, the potential effects on U.S. influence in the region must be balanced against the fact that three bomb attacks took a devastating toll of American lives in Beirut the past two years. The administration also does not want to risk repetition of the 1979-80 Iranian hostage crisis when Moslem extremists seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran.

Two U.S. warships, the aircraft carrier USS Eisenhower and the guided-missile cruiser USS Mississippi, have been dispatched to Mediterranean waters near Lebanon. But, the officials said, no decision has been made to evacuate the embassy.

The threats were precipitated by U.S. resistance to a U.N. Security Council resolution charging Israel with atrocities in southern Lebanon. The United States is trying, over objections of the Lebanese government, to sidetrack a council vote scheduled for Monday. If it fails, the United States is expected to veto the resolution.

That has resulted in threats from organizations of Shiite Moslems, the principal population group in southern Lebanon. The most extreme of these organizations, Hezballah, or the Party of God, and the Islamic Jihad, are heavily influenced by Iran and are believed to have been involved in attacks against Americans in Lebanon.

In April 1983, 17 Americans were killed in the bombing of the U.S. Embassy, 241 Marines with the multinational peacekeeping force were killed in an October 1983 blast at their quarters at Beirut airport and two Americans died in the bombing of a U.S. Embassy annex last September.

Although the number has been kept secret for security reasons, between 20 and 30 Americans are believed to be working under Ambassador Reginand Bartholomew at the heavily fortified embassy residence in East Beirut. They are the remnant of the sizable U.S. military and diplomatic presence that sprang up in 1982 when the administration regarded Lebanese President Amin Gemayel as a U.S. client.

The close U.S.-Lebanese relationship collapsed last year after Reagan pulled out the Marines in response to mounting domestic concern and Gemayel, unable to establish military superiority over dissident Lebanese factions, came under the influence of Syria.

However, the administration has felt it important to keep a diplomatic presence in Beirut to maintain a tie with the Gemayel government and to demonstrate that the United States cannot be deflected from its goals in the Middle East by terrorism.

A few days ago, the United Nations, responding to U.S. expressions of concern, pulled its American employes in southern Lebanon off the job. U.S. officials have estimated that about 1,400 American citizens live in Lebanon. They said that most have dual nationality or are married to Lebanese and have not expressed desire to leave the country.