* LAND -- Uganda is a landlocked East African nation about the size of Oregon. Most of the country is plateau; it borders Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania and Zaire.

*PEOPLE -- The population of 14 million is 63 percent Christian and 6 percent Moslem, with the rest following traditional religions. There are rivalries between the Nilo-Hamitic peoples of the north and the Bantu tribes of the south. English is the official language, but Luganda and Swahili are widely spoken.

*HISTORY -- Uganda was the home of several tribal kingdoms until European colonization in the 19th century. The territory was ruled by Britain until independence in 1962. Milton Obote, independent Uganda's first prime minister, ousted the president, Sir Edward Mutesa, in 1966 and became president himself. Idi Amin, an Army officer who had helped Obote take power, deposed Obote in 1971. During Amin's rule, human rights groups have estimated, 300,000 Ugandans were killed by government forces. Tanzania helped overthrow Amin in 1979, and Obote was elected president in December 1980. There have been recent reports of widespread torture and allegations of killings of civilians by Army units.

*ECONOMY -- Most Ugandan exports are agricultural, including coffee, tea, tobacco and cotton. During Amin's rule, the gross domestic product fell at about 1 percent a year and dropped 9 percent in 1979. Obote had attempted to rebuild the economy with international help.