*July 11, 1985: Sharon M. Scranage, 30, a CIA clerk in Ghana, and Michael A. Soussoudis, 39, a Ghanaian national, are charged with espionage after Scranage tells the FBI she had given Soussoudis, her former lover and a first cousin of Ghanaian leader Flight Lt. Jerry Rawlings, the names of CIA employes and informants.

*Aug. 7: A federal grand jury indicts Scranage and Soussoudis.

*Aug. 12: Scranage pleads guilty to two counts of disclosing identities of persons working for the CIA, but she pleads not guilty to 16 charges, including espionage. A trial date of Oct. 7 is set.

*Sept. 27: Scranage pleads guilty to revealing classified information, and 15 other charges against her are dismissed.

*Oct. 4: U.S. District Judge Albert V. Bryan Jr. rules that U.S. espionage laws cover acts committed outside U.S. territory and are applicable to noncitizens, clearing the way for a trial for Soussoudis. His attorneys had argued that U.S. courts had no power to try Soussoudis for acts in Ghana.

*Nov. 18: During a closed hearing in Alexandria federal court, Soussoudis' trial is delayed until Dec. 9.

*Nov. 19: Two Ghanaians, charged with spying for the CIA, switch their pleas to guilty. The change in pleas for Felix Peasah, 59, and Theodore Atiedu, 39, plus the delay in Soussoudis' trial, spark speculation that a spy swap is imminent.

*Nov. 25: Soussoudis receives a 20-year sentence after pleading nolo contendere to receiving classified information. His sentence is suspended on the condition that he leave the United States within 24 hours. Meanwhile, nine Ghanaians who allegedly worked with the CIA, and their families, are allowed to leave Ghana. Scranage is sentenced to five years in prison.