It is time for Congress and the president to get on with the business of adopting a budget. . . . Democrats and Republicans, the Senate and the House of Representatives, the president and Congress have all been at odds over the mechanics of action -- who goes first, who gets credit, who takes the blame. . . .

This is not a House budget, or a Senate budget, or a Republican budget, or a Democratic budget. What we are trying to adopt is a budget for the United States.

In my view, the American people do not care who acts on the budget first. . . . They are concerned about budget policies that have increased the public debt by over $1 trillion in the last five years. They do want a budget that will start reducing the deficits that have contributed to a trade deficit of $150 billion and the destruction of basic industries in this country. . . .

Up to now, President Reagan has refused to participate in efforts to shape a widely acceptable budget that would reduce deficits and begin to meet his 1981 pledge to balance the budget. Congressional budget action has been stymied by President Reagan's intransigence, his unwillingness to negotiate for any budget but his own. Yet it is clear that his budget is not acceptable to a majority of either House. The budget process has been marking time while efforts were made to persuade the president to join Congress in this deficit reduction exercise. It is clear that, without his participation in the budget process, a concensus budget cannot finally be implemented.