Mayor Marion Barry, promising to order a comprehensive study of development pressures along the Wisconsin Avenue corridor, announced yesterday that developers of a controversial office and retail complex at 4000 Wisconsin Ave. NW had agreed to make modifications aimed at assuaging community opposition.

In a statement issued after talks this week between city planning officials and the developers of the $40 million project, Barry said the firms would shift the route of the planned Glover Archbold Parkway to preserve green space. He said the firms also have agreed to provide free parking to patrons of the six theaters planned for the complex.

"We must decide how to address the problems created by the intense development pressure along the entire Wisconsin Avenue corridor," Barry said in the statement. "I do not want to see helter-skelter development along this corridor. Addressing these issues piecemeal is not the solution."

The project, which entails construction of a road that would cut through the northern entrance to the park, has been opposed by five of the six Advisory Neighborhood Commissions in Ward 3 as well as the Tenley and Cleveland Park Emergency Committee, which was formed to fight it.

Some of the project's opponents said yesterday they were pleased with the mayor's proposal to reexamine development along the avenue, but dismissed the project modifications as minor, pointing out that the developers, the Donohoe Cos. and Holladay Corp., offered similar changes months ago.

Community residents have raised concerns that the theaters, as well as the offices and retail stores, will attract an excess of automobiles to the area and create parking problems along residential streets. Barry Vows Study of Wisconsin Ave. Growth By Arthur S. Brisbane Washington Post Staff Writer

Mayor Marion Barry, promising to order a comprehensive study of development pressures along the Wisconsin Avenue corridor, announced yesterday that developers of a controversial office and retail complex at 4000 Wisconsin Ave. NW had agreed to make modifications aimed at assuaging community opposition.

In a statement issued after talks this week between city planning officials and the developers of the $40 million project, Barry said the firms would shift the route of the planned Glover Archbold Parkway to preserve green space. He said the firms also have agreed to provide free parking to patrons of the six theaters planned for the complex.

"We must decide how to address the problems created by the intense development pressure along the entire Wisconsin Avenue corridor," Barry said in the statement. "I do not want to see helter-skelter development along this corridor. Addressing these issues piecemeal is not the solution."

The project, which entails construction of a road that would cut through the northern entrance to the park, has been opposed by five of the six Advisory Neighborhood Commissions in Ward 3 as well as the Tenley and Cleveland Park Emergency Committee, which was formed to fight it.

Some of the project's opponents said yesterday they were pleased with the mayor's proposal to reexamine development along the avenue, but dismissed the project modifications as minor, pointing out that the developers, the Donohoe Cos. and Holladay Corp., offered similar changes months ago.

Community residents have raised concerns that the theaters, as well as the offices and retail stores, will attract an excess of automobiles to the area and create parking problems along residential streets.