In an abrupt reversal of administration position, Attorney General Edwin Meese III has told the Mexican attorney general that sharp criticism by U.S. officials of public corruption and drug trafficking in Mexico does not reflect the feelings of the Reagan administration.

Mexican Attorney General Sergio Garcia Ramirez told reporters yesterday that Meese called him Thursday and said that the Reagan administration does not concur with the strong criticism of Mexico by officials of the State and Justice departments and the U.S. Customs Service at a May 13 hearing of a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee.

A spokesman for the Customs Service, informed of Meese's remarks, said the service stands by its criticism. The White House declined comment, and a spokesman for the State Department, which supported Customs, said he had no idea what Meese was talking about.

Justice Department spokesman Terry Eastland confirmed that the conversation had taken place. He would not discuss Meese's statements to Garcia Ramirez, but he said Meese thinks that "the charges don't reflect the views of the president, the U.S. government or the Department of Justice."

Eastland said Meese also told Garcia Ramirez that he "appreciates the working relationship we have developed with the Mexicans," particularly in light of the recent drug enforcement meetings held in Cancun, Mexico, on April 14-15.

A statement from the Mexican Attorney General's Office said Meese "deplored the comments made in hearings of a Senate subcommittee of the United States that do not reflect, in any way, the opinion of President Ronald Reagan or the point of view of the Justice Department."

At the hearing, U.S. Customs Commissioner William von Raab complained of "an ingrained corruption in the Mexican law enforcement establishment," which he described as "massive . . . all the way up and down the ladder. Until it is corrected we will never solve the problem."

In response to questions from Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), von Raab said that "the governor of Sonora . . . is alleged to own four ranches . . . in Sonora on which all four ranches is grown marijuana or opium poppies. We believe these ranches are currently or occasionally guarded by the Mexican Federal Judicial Police and the Mexican army." Mexican Embassy officials here denied that Sonora Gov. Rodolfo Felix Valdes is involved in drug production.

Dennis Murphy, Customs director of public affairs, said yesterday, "The Customs Service stands by the commissioner's statement."

Law enforcement agents said earlier this year that they had information that Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, a suspect in the murder last year of U.S. drug enforcement agent Enrique (Kiki) Camarena Salazar, was a guest at the home of Antonio Toledo Corro, the governor of Sinaloa state. The hearing was the first indication that a second Mexican governor is suspected of involvement in drug trafficking.

Informed of Meese's call to Garcia Ramirez, a member of Helms' staff said, "Our hearing received testimony from reliable government witnesses. Until the Department of Justice can offer proof that they're wrong, we believe the hearing was valid."

On May 14, State Department spokesman Charles Redman called the hearing "a candid, public, balanced review of our concern over narcotics-related corruption and other issues."

Asked yesterday about Meese's conversation with Garcia Ramirez, Redman said, "I don't know what Meese is referring to. There's no way I can comment."

A White House official also said he had no comment on the Meese conversation.

At the same hearing, Elliott Abrams, assistant secretary of State for inter-American affairs, said, "We have told the Mexicans in no uncertain terms that we are deeply troubled by widespread drug-related corruption."

He added that the Mexican government would be "angered by this kind of discussion in public . . . . But our U.S. Reverses Its Criticism Of Mexico By M

In an abrupt reversal of administration position, Attorney General Edwin Meese III has told the Mexican attorney general that sharp criticism by U.S. officials of public corruption and drug trafficking in Mexico does not reflect the feelings of the Reagan administration.

Mexican Attorney General Sergio Garcia Ramirez told reporters yesterday that Meese called him Thursday and said that the Reagan administration does not concur with the strong criticism of Mexico by officials of the State and Justice departments and the U.S. Customs Service at a May 13 hearing of a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee.

A spokesman for the Customs Service, informed of Meese's remarks, said the service stands by its criticism. The White House declined comment, and a spokesman for the State Department, which supported Customs, said he had no idea what Meese was talking about.

Justice Department spokesman Terry Eastland confirmed that the conversation had taken place. He would not discuss Meese's statements to Garcia Ramirez, but he said Meese thinks that "the charges don't reflect the views of the president, the U.S. government or the Department of Justice."

Eastland said Meese also told Garcia Ramirez that he "appreciates the working relationship we have developed with the Mexicans," particularly in light of the recent drug enforcement meetings held in Cancun, Mexico, on April 14-15.

A statement from the Mexican Attorney General's Office said Meese "deplored the comments made in hearings of a Senate subcommittee of the United States that do not reflect, in any way, the opinion of President Ronald Reagan or the point of view of the Justice Department."

At the hearing, U.S. Customs Commissioner William von Raab complained of "an ingrained corruption in the Mexican law enforcement establishment," which he described as "massive . . . all the way up and down the ladder. Until it is corrected we will never solve the problem."

In response to questions from Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), von Raab said that "the governor of Sonora . . . is alleged to own four ranches . . . in Sonora on which all four ranches is grown marijuana or opium poppies. We believe these ranches are currently or occasionally guarded by the [Mexican] Federal Judicial Police and the Mexican army." Mexican Embassy officials here denied that Sonora Gov. Rodolfo Felix Valdes is involved in drug production.

Dennis Murphy, Customs director of public affairs, said yesterday, "The Customs Service stands by the commissioner's statement."

Law enforcement agents said earlier this year that they had information that Miguel Angel Felix Gallardo, a suspect in the murder last year of U.S. drug enforcement agent Enrique (Kiki) Camarena Salazar, was a guest at the home of Antonio Toledo Corro, the governor of Sinaloa state. The hearing was the first indication that a second Mexican governor is suspected of involvement in drug trafficking.

Informed of Meese's call to Garcia Ramirez, a member of Helms' staff said, "Our hearing received testimony from reliable government witnesses. Until the Department of Justice can offer proof that they're wrong, we believe the hearing was valid."

On May 14, State Department spokesman Charles Redman called the hearing "a candid, public, balanced review of our concern over narcotics-related corruption and other issues."

Asked yesterday about Meese's conversation with Garcia Ramirez, Redman said, "I don't know what Meese is referring to. There's no way I can comment."

A White House official also said he had no comment on the Meese conversation.

At the same hearing, Elliott Abrams, assistant secretary of State for inter-American affairs, said, "We have told the Mexicans in no uncertain terms that we are deeply troubled by widespread drug-related corruption."

He added that the Mexican government would be "angered by this kind of discussion in public . . . . But our purpose is not to call names. It's to look forward to a better chance in the future. This is a very serious business . . . . They have got to get organized to stop this before it gets too late, and it can get too late."

Officials of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration and the Immigration and Naturalization Service also described escalating drug traffic across the southwest border that has made Mexico the No. 1 source for heroin and marijuana and a conduit for more than 30 percent of the cocaine coming into the United States.

The Mexican government filed a strong protest with Secretary of State George P. Shultz, charging that members of the Reagan administration had made "denigrating statements" that enhanced "feelings of suspicion, mistrust and animosity" between the countries.

Federal law enforcement agents have frequently complained privately about drug-related corruption by Mexican officials, but the Helms hearing marked the first time that U.S. officials have publicly criticized the Mexicans in such strong terms.

Garcia Ramirez late last week asked the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City to forward any evidence of corruption that might have been gathered in the Senate Latin American affairs subcommittee hearing. "I am still waiting for that information," he said. "Apparently they don't have any."