A lawyer's work is never done. Peter J. Wallison, who succeeded Fred Fielding as counsel to the president, appears in this month's Washingtonian magazine as the author of a stern we-are-not-amused letter to the editor.

In its June issue, Washingtonian illustrated an article on sunglasses with photographs of President and Nancy Reagan sporting designer shades. The pictures were clearly composites (the photos were black and white; the glasses were superimposed in color), and the captions had a waggish tone ("Ronald Reagan is cool in Cooper Vision's 'Revo' shades," and "Nancy Reagan chills out in a pair of Vuarnet 'Doe' sunglasses," they said), but the White House was annoyed.

"It has been a longstanding policy of this and previous administrations," wrote Wallison, "to prohibit the use of the names or likeness of the president, the First Lady, or the White House in advertising or commercial promotion in any way that suggests a connection between the president or First Lady and such advertising or promotion . . . . I am sure that you were unaware of this policy and anticipate that you will cooperate with it in the future."

Washingtonian, however, doesn't seem contrite. In the same issue as Wallison's letter, it published a note to readers curious about how the composites were made. "The photographer got a picture of President Reagan, blew it up to life size, poked holes in it, added the sunglasses, and then took a picture . . . . " Clearing Out . . .

The Department of Commerce is losing its assistant secretary for international economic policy, Joseph F. Dennin, who will leave in July for the Washington law office of McKenna, Conner & Cuneo. Film Noir . . .

A General Accounting Office report for Rep. Mike Synar (D-Okla.) shows our federal lands are rugged places indeed. The study looked at how often the Bureau of Land Management granted permits for "commercial ventures." It listed movies filmed on public land in California: "Megaforce," "Black Moon Rising," "Savage Dawn" and "When Hell's in Session."