Albert R. Brashear, deputy White House press secretary for domestic affairs since 1985, is moving to Schaumberg, Ill., and a job with Motorola Inc. He'll be at his new desk on July 15, working as vice president for public affairs and advertising.

Brashear, 44, was with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Interior Department before joining the White House staff. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said yesterday that no successor has been named. Brashear departs June 15. The $50,000 Typo . . .

Supporters of Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Tex.) were asked recently to dig deep into their pockets and make $50,000 annual contributions for membership to the "Gramm Senate Club."

The matter caught the attention of the Federal Election Commission, whose rules limit personal contributions to $1,000 per election, until Gramm's staff convinced the FEC it was a mistake.

"It was a mechanical error," explained Gramm spokesman Larry Neal. "A decimal was dropped, it should have been $500. In any printing of any kind, there are occasionally errors. It happens."

Neal said the errant solicitation cards were mailed in January to several thousand past contributors to Gramm's campaigns. The printer, Communications Specialists Inc. of Austin, mailed letters correcting and apologizing for the mistake once it was discovered.

Neal said it was the first time such a mistake had been made in the Gramm campaign. And besides, he added, "We didn't get any $50,000 contributions."Courtesy Gift . . .

Two rugs listed in a 1986 financial report to the House as gifts from an undisclosed foreign donor came from Pakistan, Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.) said yesterday. The rugs -- worth less than $550 -- were a courtesy gift. "I suppose I made a mistake in including that with my ethics statement because it raised a lot of questions," he said. "But I did, and it's really no big deal as far as I'm concerned."

Revealing the donor, Hyde noted, "makes a big thing out of it, and might embarrass Pakistan."Joy of Angling . . .

A grain of salt is always required with White House proclamations on the celebration of National Something-or-Other Week. After all, how do you avoid a certain hyperbole when asking citizens to rejoice in, say, National Watermelon Week?

But President Reagan's proclamation of National Fishing Week this week, June 1-7, may set a new standard for hyperbole. Fishing is not only a provider of "abiding benefits," not only a great contributor to the national economy, not only "synonymous in our society with relaxation and with outdoor enjoyment" and not only "an important opportunity for children and young adults to become acquainted with the bounty and the wonder of our nation's natural resources."

It is also a foot soldier in the War on Drugs, providing those same Young People "wholesome recreational pursuits that will promote a sense of accomplishment and of traditional values that can serve to shield them from the perils of modern life such as drug and alcohol abuse."Move Over, Tom Cruise . . .

At the White House daily news briefing yesterday, Fitzwater was asked about U.S. reaction to the 19-year-old West German who landed his plane near the Kremlin. "We'd like to hire that guy for flight training," Fitzwater deadpanned.