Following are excerpts from President Chun Doo Hwan's statement on television accepting party leader Roh Tae Woo's proposals for democratic reforms:

I believe that you, my fellow countrymen, not only experienced serious inconvenience and anxiety {during three weeks of rioting} but were also worried that catastrophe might befall the nation if that state of affairs continued.

Under such circumstances, I spent many sleepless nights thinking long and hard about what should be done for the present and future of the republic and its people and how . . . I keenly sensed the strong determination and profound thoughts about the country and the people reflected in his {party leader Roh's} proposals.

Furthermore, I was convinced that the substance of his proposals was not only in full accord with my own thinking but would certainly open the way for a grand national compromise and reconciliation. I thus decided to fully accept Mr. Roh's recommendations and take measures to promote epochal democratic development and national harmony.

I hereby make it clear that the 13th presidential elections will be held under a new Constitution, if the basic law is expeditiously revised and enacted following an agreement between the government party and the opposition on a direct presidential election system, and that on Feb. 25, 1988, I will transfer the reins of government to the president thus elected . . . .

In addition, I make it clear that I have instructed the Cabinet to take the necessary measures, including all recommendations by Mr. Roh, to further democratic development and national cohesion and to stabilize the life of all citizens, including farmers and workers . . . .

I know well that when I announced on April 13 a decision to suspend couterproductive debate on constitutional reform and to pursue a peaceful transition of power under the present Constitution, my true intention was misunderstood and opposed by many . . . .

Until now, I could not readily accept a direct presidential election system on account of my concern about various ills that such a system may entail . . . . The direct presidential election system that we had in the past led to protracted one-man rule. Moreover, direct elections fanned regional antagonisms, causing serious confrontation among citizens from different districts, as well as general social confusion . . . .

However, I clearly recognize the fact that regardless of the possible merits and demerits of a particular system, and irrespective of the preferences of any specific political party, the general public has an ardent desire to choose the president directly. No matter how good a system may be, it is of no use if the people do not want it . . . .

With the decision I have made today, I join you in looking forward to a new era of democratic development and mature politics. Our politics must now cast aside its old shabby ways that are incongruous with our level of economic development and thus achieve an advanced form of democracy that we can proudly show to the world.

. . . Let us work another miracle by developing Korea into a model of political development deserving to be so recorded in world history; we must not be content with having merely become a model of economic development . . . .

I believe that everyone -- the students who have participated in demonstrations, the policemen who have labored to quell them, the citizens who have been tormented by the clouds of tear gas -- has the same desire to defend and promote freedom and democracy . . . .

I solicit you, my fellow citizens, to continue to support and encourage me in keeping with the ardent desire and enthusiasm for democratic development so that a political miracle can be brought off.

I have truly no other personal ambition than to be appreciated by posterity as the pioneer who opened a new era of genuine democracy in Korean history by setting an example of a peaceful transfer of power and by thus solidifying the foundation of democracy.