Secretary of State George P. Shultz concluded his two days of testimony yesterday.

ON WHAT THE PRESIDENT DID NOT TELL

Shultz testified that although President Reagan did not disclose to him vital information about the president's authorization of the secret sales of U.S. arms to Iran, he did not believe that Reagan was deceiving him.

Responding to Sen. George J. Mitchell (D-Maine), who described a series of meetings during formation of the Iran initiatives at which the president did not mention signing "findings," Shultz said, "If the thrust of your questions is that the president was part of an effort to see that I didn't know what was going on, I don't . . . believe that."

ON THE IMPACT OF REVEALING THE ARMS SALES

The secret arms-for-hostages deals temporarily soured relations with moderate governments such as Kuwait, Shultz testified. He said he cabled the Kuwaiti foreign minister in December to reassure him that there had been no change in U.S. policy on terrorism, after receiving a report that then-national security adviser John M. Poindexter may have reversed a key part of it during an earlier meeting.

ON THE LETTER FROM CASEY

The late CIA Director William J. Casey, in an effort to force Shultz's resignation, wrote Reagan last Nov. 23 to say that the president "needed a new pitcher" at the State Department.

ON ELLIOTT ABRAMS

Shultz testified that Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams had made a "mistake" when he misled the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence about soliciting Brunei for a contribution to the contras and compounded the error by making a "combative apology."