Sen. Robert J. Dole (Kan.) won clear victories yesterday in the South Dakota primary and Minnesota precinct caucuses as he recharged his bid for the Republican presidential nomination in his midwestern home base.

South Dakota gave Rep. Richard A. Gephardt (Mo.) a comeback win over Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis, but Dukakis topped the field in Minnesota, becoming the first Democrat to win a contest outside his home region.

Dole, who was angry at his surprise loss to Vice President Bush on Feb. 16 in New Hampshire, outpolled the entire field in South Dakota and had a solid win in the more heavily contested Minnesota race. Dole had started the year by winning the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 8.

Former television evangelist Pat Robertson was running second in both states, gaining fresh credibility for his effort. The two states delivered bad news to Rep. Jack Kemp (N.Y.), who had harbored particularly high hopes in Minnesota until Robertson became a factor.

Facing probable losses, Bush had bailed out of both states, taking his campaign directly South after New Hampshire. He quit Minnesota early, and mostly gave up South Dakota after his third-place finish in Iowa.

With 99 percent of the South Dakota precincts reported, Dole led with 55 percent; Robertson 20; Bush 19; Kemp 5, and 1 percent uncommitted.

In the Democratic race, Gephardt had 44 percent; Dukakis 31; Sen. Albert Gore Jr. (Tenn.) 8; Sen Paul Simon (Ill.) 6, former senator Gary Hart (Colo.) and Jesse L. Jackson 5 percent each.

In Minnesota, with 80 percent of the precincts reported, Dole had 43 percent in the Republican straw poll; Robertson 28; Kemp 15; Bush 11, with 3 percent uncommitted.

With 73 percent of the Democratic precincts tallied, Dukakis had 34 percent; Jackson 20; Simon 18; Gephardt 7; Gore and Hart, 1 percent each, with 19 percent uncommitted.

After Dole won the Iowa precinct caucuses, the other Republicans virtually ceded his victory in South Dakota, doing varying amounts of advertising but little personal campaigning. Nonetheless, he trumpeted his triumph. He told reporters, "We're in this race for the long haul." Citing his support in midwestern farm areas, Dole said, "There's a lot of agriculture in the South and we're going to South Carolina tomorrow."

Dole clearly had reason to crow abut his twin victories, but all the candidates found some reason for bragging.

Gephardt told reporters that South Dakota was "a great victory" for him, because Dukakis had a 16-point lead there the day after the Massachusetts governor won the New Hampshire primary. "He was on TV for a month . . . and we won," Gephardt said.

He clearly staged a strong final week comeback, powered by an endorsement from Sen. Thomas B. Daschle (D-S.D.) and a commercial ridiculing Dukakis' approach to farm issues.

Dukakis' campaign manager Susan Estrich called it "a very good night" for the Massachusetts governor. In addition to a first and a second in two states far from his home, she said, "we gained the most delegates by far, and the name of the game is delegates."

Minnesota will send 87 delegates to the Democratic National Convention and 31 to the Republican National Convention. South Dakota has 19 Democratic and 18 Republican convention delegates.

Robertson said, "I'm from the South and I expect to be strong in the South, but this {the pair of seconds} shows I have good support all over the country." He then took a jab at Kemp's showing, saying, "I don't see how you can maintain a campaign on thirds and fourths. Minnesota was supposed to be very strong for him . . . . If he has any honor, he'll be out."

However, Kemp professed satisfaction with his third-place showing in Minnesota. "After I beat Pat Robertson in New Hampshire, I decided to make a strong effort in South Carolina and to forego a costly effort in Minnesota," he said. "The Dole campaign outspent us by a margin of 7 to 1 and our volunteer effort there beat a sitting vice president, which is very good news for us."

Jackson also sounded an upbeat note about the results. "We continue to show growth and expansion and to show that we can draw votes from any section of the country," he said. "Our acceptance level continues to rise."

Simon, who said last week that he needed to win either Minnesota or South Dakota, was asked if his showing last night signaled the end of his campaign. "There is no chance I'll get out of the race, absolutely none," he replied.

Candidates such as Dole, Dukakis and Gephardt counted on a good showing in the two states to give their campaigns a boost heading into the southern regional "Super Tuesday" primary on March 8, when hundreds of delegates will be at stake. Bush, after making an early effort in South Dakota, took a bye in both midwestern states to concentrate on Super Tuesday.

Gephardt, making a late effort to prevent a Dukakis sweep after losing to him in New Hampshire, cut into Dukakis' lead with a television spot charging that the Massachusetts governor had little understanding of farm problems. It recalled Dukakis' suggestion in Iowa last year that Midwest farmers switch to raising Belgian endive and blueberries.

Supporters manning Dukakis' telephone banks, which contacted 5,000 voters on Sunday and 5,000 on Monday, changed their message from a soft-sell to a charge that Gephardt proposed an oil import tax that would cost each South Dakota family $633 a year, to raise the price of gasoline by as much as 18 cents a gallon and drive as many as 3,000 jobs out of the state in the next four years.

Dukakis also ran a radio ad charging that while Gephardt was "publicly promising to fight for you, he's taking political action committee money from corporate insiders and Washington lobbyists."

------------CAUCUS RESULTS-----------------

----UNOFFICIAL RETURNS FROM MINNESOTA------

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Candidate..........Votes..........%

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DEMOCRATS

With 2,991 of 4,076 precincts,

73 percent, reported:

Dukakis........... 8,939........34%

Jackson........... 5,188........20%

Uncommitted....... 4,979....... 19%

Simon..............4,719....... 18%

Gephardt...........1,960........ 7%

Gore................ 274........ 1%

Hart................ 186........ 1%

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REPUBLICANS

With 3,274 of 4,076 precincts,

80 percent, reported:

Dole............. 23,923........ 43%

Robertson........ 15,969........ 28%

Kemp.............. 8,535........ 15%

Bush.............. 5,979........ 11%

Uncommitted ...... 1,613......... 3% SOURCE: Associated Press

---------PRIMARY RESULTS--------------------

----UNOFFICIAL RETURNS FROM SOUTH DAKOTA....

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Candidate..........Votes............%

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DEMOCRATS

With 1,148 of 1,151 precincts,

99 percent, reported:

Gephardt......... 31,182......... 44%

Dukakis.......... 22,335......... 31%

Gore.............. 5,987......... 8%

Simon............. 3,983.......... 6%

Hart.............. 3,835.......... 5%

Jackson........... 3,782.......... 5%

Babbitt............. 345.......... 0%

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REPUBLICANS

With 1,150 of 1,151 precincts,

99 percent, reported:

Dole............. 51,529.......... 55%

Robertson........ 18,275.......... 20%

Bush............. 17,416.......... 19%

Kemp.............. 4,266........... 5%

Uncommitted....... 1,220........... 1%

Du Pont............. 575........... 1%

SOURCE: Associated Press