Listed below are partial results of an ongoing survey of members of Congress conducted by The Washington Post. This survey is designed to report the receipt of honoraria by members of the House and Senate. Congressional rules require disclosure only once a year, in May.

The chart notes that some members have a policy of not accepting honoraria. Others refused to respond to questions about recent honoraria.

The Federal Page will publish partial results of this survey from time to time, as members respond and space permits.

Senator................1990 Honoraria...................Total 1989

.........................................................Honoraria

Daniel K. Akaka (D-Hawaii) Does not accept honoraria....New member

John Breaux (D-La.) Refused to disclose 1990 honoraria..$53,000

Richard H. Bryan .......................................$27,900

(D-Nev.)Serves on

Banking,Housing and

Urban Affairs;

Commerce, Science

and Transportation;

Joint Economic

committees

....................$1,000 from Electronic Industries Association, Jan. 8

....................$2,000 from American Advertising Federation, Jan. 31

....................$1,000 from U.S. Telephone Association, Feb. 1

....................$1,000 from Capitol Forum, Feb. 20

....................$1,000 from American Council of Life Insurance, Feb. 26

....................$2,000 from American Bankers Association, Feb. 28

....................$2,000 from National Association of Credit Management, March 5

....................$2,000 from the Wine Institute, May 2

....................$1,000 from the American Institute of Architects, June 1

....................$2,000 from the Beer Institute, July 25

Pete V. Domenici (R-N.M.)Refused to disclose 1990 honoraria....$50,500

Dave Durenberger (R-Minn.).....................................$62,185

Environment and Public

Works Finance;Labor

and Human Resources

$1,000 from American Academy of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgeons, March 1

....................$2,000 from Palo Alto Medical Foundation, March 10

....................$2,000 from Allstate Insurance Co., March 15

....................$2,000 from Food and Machinery Corp., March 15

....................$1,000 from Business Week magazine, April 2

....................$2,000 from American Collectors Association, April 9

....................$259 from University of South Florida, May 1

....................$400 from Brookings Institution, May 29

....................$2,000 from American Protestant Health Association, May 31

....................$500 from Catholic Health Association, July 20

....................$2,000 from George Mason University Center for Health Policy, Sept. 1

....................$2,000 from Baker & Hostetler, Sept. 27

Slade Gorton (R-Wash.)....................................$28,400

Agriculture, Nutrition

and Forestry;Armed

Services;Commerce,

Science and Transportation

....................$2,000 from Association of Independent Television Stations, Jan. 5

.....................$2,000 from Snack Food Association, March 11

;....................$1,000 from National Restaurant Association, March 14

.....................$1,000 from National Lumber and Building Materials Association, March 27

....................$2,000 from Recording Industry Association of America, March 29

....................$2,000 from Rockwell International Corp., April 17

....................$1,000 from Preston Gates Ellis & Rouvelas Meeds, April 19

....................$2,000 from Regional and Distribution Carriers Conference, May 7

....................$400 from Brookings Institution, May 21

....................$750 from Pacific Northwest Grain and Feed Association, June 15

....................$500 from Ethics and Public Policy Center Inc., June 20

....................$1,000 from National Association of Broadcasters, June 20

....................$1,000 from Hazardous Waste Action Council, June 25

....................$2,000 from COMSAT, June 26

....................$400 from Brookings Institution, July 16

....................$2,000 from Northrop Corp., July 17

....................$2,000 from Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors Association, Aug. 11

....................$2,000 from Schnell Publishing Co., Sept. 18

Phil Gramm (R-Tex.)Refused to disclose 1990 honoraria........$39,775

Mark O. Hatfield (R-Ore.)Refused to disclose 1990 honoraria..$25,750

Herbert H. Kohl (D-Wis.)Does not accept honoraria............None

Larry Pressler (R-S.D.)Refused to disclose 1990 honoraria....$48,750

Richard C. Shelby (D-Ala.)Refused to dislcose 1990 honoraria.$35,000

Paul Simon (D-Ill.)..........................................$22,650

Budget;Foreign

Relations;Judiciary;

Labor and Human

Resources

....................$1,000 from American Council on Education

....................$1,000 from Association of Independent Colleges and Schools

....................$2,000 from Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs

....................$2,000 from CBS Records Inc.

....................$2,000 from Conference on China's Democracy and Reunification

....................$1,000 from National Agriculture Chemicals Association

....................$2,000 from Recording Industry Association of America

NOTE: Dates were not available for some honoraria. Some members give a portion or all of their honoraria to charity. There is a limit on the amount of honoraria that members of Congress are allowed to keep each year. Members of the Senate are allowed to retain up to 40 percent of their congressional pay in honoraria.

Daniel K. Akaka (D-Hawaii), appointed April 28 to the Senate seat vacated by the death of Sen. Spark M. Matsunaga, did not accept honoraria in 1989 while serving in the House of Representatives.