Ross Perot recruited two experienced political professionals to his insurgent presidential campaign yesterday, Democrat Hamilton Jordan and Republican Edward J. Rollins, in a move that further rattled an already demoralized White House and Republican establishment.

The announcement was particularly bitter for the GOP because Rollins, who came to Washington in 1980 as a Reagan Republican and stayed for a decade to run GOP campaigns, is part of the party establishment, if not always a defender of its current president.

On the Democratic side, signing up Jordan as campaign co-chairman gives Perot claim to the political operative who orchestrated a winning Democratic presidential campaign against a sitting Republican president -- Jimmy Carter's 1976 defeat of Gerald R. Ford. Jordan also presided over Carter's disastrous loss to Republican Ronald Reagan four years later.

At a joint news conference in Dallas, both Jordan and Rollins said they decided to break with politics as usual and join the Texas billionaire after concluding that neither party offered any hope of breaking the political gridlock in Washington or solving the nation's fundamental problems.

"I doubt if there's been a time in the recent history of our country where there's been a greater disparity between what the American people want and expect from government and what both political parties have provided them," said Jordan, who also served as Carter's White House chief of staff.

The announcement was made at a time when the Bush White House is under attack by Republicans across the spectrum for ineptness. As it struggles to right itself, the White House has been bombarded with increasingly frantic calls from outsiders for a return of longtime Bush friend and political adviser James A. Baker III, now secretary of state, or Defense Secretary Richard B. Cheney to run the White House.

Sources said yesterday that embattled White House Chief of Staff Samuel K. Skinner held a private luncheon with Baker yesterday, and that Skinner is considering bringing in a new deputy chief of staff to work with or replace W. Henson Moore, with some of Baker's top aides on his list.

Both White House and Baker aides denied such a scenario was discussed at the lunch. One senior official said President Bush "is if anything determined to not make any quick changes right now or it would look like full-scale panic."

Trying to regain some initiative and break the hold Perot has had over television news coverage, Bush scheduled the second formal evening news conference of his presidency tonight in the White House East Room, where he planned to promote the balanced budget amendment to the Constitution in a forum -- give and take with reporters -- where he usually excels.

But all the networks except CNN declined to provide live coverage and Clinton scheduled his own television appearance on the Larry King show. One Bush adviser said, "We thought we'd try it and see if it worked. It didn't."

Bush Republicans dismissed Rollins -- Reagan's campaign manager in 1984 -- as a "has-been" whose political skills have been exaggerated. One Bush campaign adviser said of Rollins, "He didn't run the 1984 Reagan campaign, Jim Baker did. Now he's a hired gun. It's a one-day wonder that might give Perot some legitimacy with political insiders but no one knows who Rollins or Jordan are." But some nonetheless feared that Rollins might lead a parade of other disaffected Republicans into the Perot camp.

Rollins said Bush "has served this country ably" and had been a "superb commander in chief," but that getting the economy moving again and bringing a change in the way Washington works was probably going to take "somebody like Mr. Perot. . . . There'a an awful lot of Americans who just don't feel the parties represent them anymore."

Tom Luce, Perot's longtime chief counsel and now chairman of the Perot petition committee, said that Rollins will serve as the day-to-day manager of the campaign while Jordan, most recently a vice president for education entrepreneur Christopher Whittle's company, will be political strategist.

Rollins said in an interview yesterday that he was not taking the job for money and insisted that rumors of million-dollar deals, either now or after the November election, are "pure crap." He would not say how much he is being paid, but said it is "significantly less than a half-million" and less than he is earning as a consultant. "Billionaires don't make millionaires of their staffs," Rollins said of Perot.

"I'm putting myself at great risk," he said at the Dallas news conference ". . . I've shut down a business, broken with friends. If I didn't really believe in this, there isn't enough money in the world to make me do this."

On the personal side, Rollins's wife, Sherrie Rollins, a public relations executive recruited into the Bush White House only four months ago, resigned a few hours before the Dallas announcement with a written statement calling Bush's reelection "crucial for the future of the country."

She had been urged by many Republicans to stay as a statement of two-career independence, but said, "For me to stay to prove my independence would interfere with the ultimate purpose of my being here, to serve the president I support. I would have become a distraction."

Many of Bush's aides and advisers close to Rollins had tried to persuade him not dart to Perot, a man he never met until last weekend, and were convinced they had been successful. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Jack Kemp, whose 1988 presidential primary campaign against Bush was run by Rollins, tried to talk Rollins out of the move. Bush senior consultant James H. Lake, for whom Rollins worked briefly, also made the effort, as did Republican National Committee Chairman Richard N. Bond, a longtime friend.

Several Republicans bitterly said the Bush team was to blame for harboring grudges against Rollins for his often impolitic criticisms of the president, and declining when he offered his services earlier this year. "You can blame this on the president," one prominent Republican said. "He was so angry with Ed that he made sure he'd have no role in 1992, and Ed can't sit out a presidential campaign like this. They lost him."

Rollins was among the first Republicans to question Bush's 1988 selection of Sen. Dan Quayle (R-Ind.) as running mate. Rollins publicly called for the firing of then-White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu when other Republicans would only do so privately, and, in a highly public rift, called on Republican congressional candidates in 1990 to dissociate themselves from the Bush budget deal with Congress that included tax increases Bush had pledged as a candidate never to allow.

Bush was said by aides first to have been shocked and then angered by the Rollins move, and a senior official said the White House yesterday was "reeling" over the announcement. White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater, however, denied that any radical changes in direction in personnel were imminent. He said he was told the Skinner-Baker session primarily concerned foreign policy, a characterization also offered by Baker's chief political adviser and spokesman, Margaret Tutwiler.

Devroy reported from Washington and Isikoff from Dallas.

This table profiles registered Democrats and Republicans who voted in Tuesday's California primary and how they might vote in the November presidential election.

The first column of numbers is labeled % Voters. Numbers in this column add down the column for each category. For example, 48% of those who responded to the November presidential election question were males and 52% were females. Not all of these categories will add to 100% because "don't know" is not included and because of the way the numbers are rounded.

The remaining columns represent the percentage of a category who said they would vote for each of the listed candidates in November, and these numbers are to be read across the row. For example, of the 48% of males who chose a candidate for the November election, 24% said they would vote for George Bush, 24% for Bill Clinton and 45% said they would vote for Ross Perot. Not all of these categories will add to 100% because the percentage who said they would not vote in November and the percentage who did not answer were not included.

................................. % ..............................

................................. Voters......Bush..Clinton..Perot

If these are the presidential candidates in November, who would you vote for? ............................................. 23% .... 27% .. 41%

Sex of respondent:

Male ................................ 48 ..... 24 ..... 24 ... 45

Female .............................. 52 ..... 23 ..... 30 ... 39

Race of respondent:

White ............................... 83 ..... 25 ..... 24 ... 44

Black ................................ 8 ...... 7 ..... 58 ... 22

Hispanic (may be of any race) ........ 7 ..... 15 ..... 40 ... 34

Asian ................................ 2 ..... 40 ..... 19 ... 35

Income of respondent:

Less than $15,000 ................... 10 ..... 18 ..... 41 ... 33

$15,000 - $29,999 ................... 18 ..... 19 ..... 31 ... 41

$30,000 - $49,999 ................... 29 ..... 24 ..... 25 ... 42

$50,000 - $74,999 ................... 24 ..... 28 ..... 23 ... 43

$75,000 or over ..................... 20 ..... 21 ..... 24 ... 46

Party Affiliation:

Democrats ........................... 39 ...... 6 ..... 53 ... 32

Republicans ......................... 38 ..... 48 ...... 5 ... 42

Independents/Other ................. 23 ..... 12 ..... 19 ... 58

Ideology:

Liberal ............................. 28 ...... 9 ..... 47 ... 35

Moderate ............................ 39 ..... 18 ..... 27 ... 48

Conservative ........................ 32 ..... 42 ...... 9 ... 41

Compared to four years ago, is your family's financial situation:

Better today ........................ 20 ..... 34 ..... 24 ... 35

Worse today ......................... 37 ..... 11 ..... 30 ... 50

About the same ...................... 41 ..... 29 ..... 26 ... 38

Should the Democratic/Republican party platform:

Support keeping abortion legal ...... 58 ..... 15 ..... 33 ... 44

Oppose keeping abortion legal ....... 18 ..... 47 ..... 15 ... 31

Take no official stand on abortion .. 22 ..... 24 ..... 22 ... 46

NOTE: Data show final exit poll results for 3,680 registered California Republican and Democratic voters randomly selected at the polls Tuesday, June 2. Poll results were provided by Voter Research and Surveys of New York, an association of ABC, CNN, CBS and NBC News. Margin of sampling error is plus or minus 1.5 percentage points. Results based on part of the sample will have larger margins of error. Interviewing was conducted by Chilton Research Services of Radnor, Pa.

Compiled by senior polling analyst Sharon Warden