Shades of the uproar a couple years back when a television special on evils of hunting brought outraged shouts that the other side of the story be shown. The show last week on hockey, "the Deadliest Season," roused the Capitals (and we assume othe NHL teams) to an open letter to the program's sponsor, Xerox Corp.

Signed by Andy Delich Caps director of marketing, it goes:

"I feel that it presented a distorted view of professional hockey that will be indelibly eichad in the minds of millions of viewers, especially youngsters. Unfortunately, we foll 'The Deadliest Season' created the false impression that teams like the capitals are willing to duck the correspondences of dangerous and violent actions . . . an irresponsible controyal of our copition . . . We agree that premodivated violence has no place in any sport . . . The Capitals have spent hundreds of hours and thousands of dollars conducting youth hockey programs which provide proper instruction so that the violent aspects of the game are controlled. Since you spent thousand of dollars espousing negative side of violence, I believe you should at least investigate how you can spend money to improve the positive educational give of youth hockey . . . to convince the public that Xerox Corporation was intrested in the fundamental issue of reducing violence in hockey and not last exploiting the sensational aspects of the same.

"I would appreciate the opportunity to speak with you . . . about the possibility of sponsoring youth hockey clinics in the Washington area. With the proper funds, instruction and equipment, the events portrayed in. 'The Deadliest Season' need never occur."

The letter is dated March 18. On March 20, the captain of the Capitals set a club record for penalty minutes in a game, 29, finally being ejected after he responded to a check from behind by, as the game report went, "planting his stick in the Sabre's stomach. (Then) they parried stick thrusts for a while . . ."

C'est la Guerre. At least Yvon Labre's violence wasn't "permeditated." And we can already hear rooters say that bringing it up here is your real low blow.

C'est la Vie . . .

It was evident to witnesses as Lee Trevino tried to come back on the Floids tour that he wasn't the old Super Mex. Now, confessing he tried "to play too much too soo" after last fall's back operation, he withdrew yesterday from the masters at Augusta, Ga., April 7.10. His wire said his doctors advised him "a few weeks of light exerdise and whirlpool will put me back in playing shape." He hopes to play the Tournament of Champions in Californis the week after the Masters - he never cared for the ugusta National course anyway. Tevino tied for 39th at Inverrary, for 75th in the Citrus, missed the doral cut and after one practice round in the TPC gave it up - "My back just won't take it."

Joe Sullivan, the former George Allen righthand man here who left to director St. Louis Cardinal football operations, faces a coronary bypass operation in a St. Louis hospital today. Sullivan, 53, beat a serious heart attack in 1975 but as been hospitalized since chest pains got the better of him last week . . . In Chicago, new Bear Pat Sullivan feels he has a far better chance of playing some quarterback for Jack Pardee than the Redskins gave him last year. After being cut by Washington, Sullivan went home to Birmingham, Ala, where he and a cousin set up a construction business - "dug the foundations by hand, mixed and poured concrete," etc. The Auburn alum with the 1971 Heisman Trophy said, "I think last year when I left Washington I became frustrated . . . said I'll just sit out and evaluate what football means to me, and now I'm more than anxious to get back into it. It made me a little more hungry . . . I guess I really believe I can play" - and give ex-Terp Bob Avellini a run for his starting job . . .

Jack Hartman, coach of Kansas State's basketball champions, has changed his mind about the Oklahoma State coaching post he accepted Monday and returned to K-State to the cheers of an impromptu news conference gathering inManhattan, Kan. Hartman, who has a 135.62 log for seven Wildcat campaigns, said he at second thoughts even as he flew to Stillwarter, Okia, Tuesday and came to "realize I had made a hasty decision, a decision under pressure . . . I made a mistake, a turnover, if you will, and two only way I know how to correct a mistake is to look it in the eye and try to amend it."

Barry Mendelson, 34, was fired yesterday as general manager of the NBA's New Orieans Jazz. Larry Hatfield, chairman of the owning corporation, said "the club's credibility has suffered and Barry has evolved into a controversial figure." Mendelson fired Butch van Breda Kloff as coach when the team was 14-12 and gave the job to Elgin Baylor, under whom the Jazz is 14-30. Mendelson also caught much heat for trading away much too much in draft choices to the Lakers for Gail Goodrich, who turned out to be hobbling on an ankle that gave way and required surgery . . . All the static spewing from the Philadelphia 76er roster has evoked from coach Gene Shue the institution of fines starting at $500 for any player making "detrimental" remarks about the team. Second offense for bad-mouthing: $1,000 . . .

Marvia Barnes saga, chapter 1313: One reason he said he didn't want to play in the NBA playoffa, he declared, was that Detroit Piston coach Herb Brown was using him only 18 Minutes a game. O.K., said brown, starting with Tuesday's practice, you're a starter. Given permission to stay over a day in Denver after Sunday's game, Barnes stayed over at least two days, phoning the slub office to inform, without giving a reason, that he wouldn't make Tuesday's practice."He's supposed to be here," groused Brown - who has another, bigger worry: Bob Lanier's broken hand. After the surgical stitches were removed, the doctor said it will be another 17 or 18 days before the star center can play. That would be just in time for the playoffs - if detroit wins its may there without him, But Lanier isn't sure: If it got messed up again, it would be a more difficult operation and it would jeopardize me. If my future is in danger, I ain't going to mess around" . . .