"I was born in Oklahoma and there is something about your home that keeps bringing you back, Jim Killingsworth told the folks in Stillwater yesterday.

Economics is the only reason I'm leaving. It's a financial opportunity I can't pass up," Killingsworth told the folks in Pocatello the day before.

Yes, the "something" that enticed the coach who put Idaho State on the basketball map this year was a four-year contract at $32,000 per. And, at age 52, a shot at the Big Eight after 28 years of high school and college coaching, the last six at Idaho State with a 109-54 record in which the 109th win was the biggie - the NCCA regional surprise that delected UCLA from the final four for a change, 76-76 . . .

The Oklahoma State job is the one Kansas State's Jack Harman accepted, then forsook, in a quck turnabout last week. Which works us around to Mark Reiner, K-State assistant who for a little while there thought he had a lock on the Wildcat head-coaching post.

Reiner, a 13-year veteran of New York City high school coaching, brought star players Curtis Redding and Tyrone Ladson from his Canarsie High team last year when he switched from Brooklyn (N.Y.) to Manhattan (Kan.) - and helped create Hartman's Big Eight champions who pushed Marquette, eventual winner of it all, to the limit, a hairy 67-66, in the regionals. When Hartman switched to Oklahoma State, Reiner began campaigning hard for the supposedly open job at K-State. When Harman switched back, Reiner found himself on a limb - no way Hartman won't be listening for his footsteps from now on. A rally of pep band, 800 students and faculty persuaded Reiner to stay on - for now. But if he lands fellow Brooklynite Albert King, the superhigh schooler - and you can reckon Reiner among the coterie of coaches tailing the talent at the Capital Classic here last night and at Pittsburgh's Roundball Classic tonight, where King performs again - it could be a parting gift. He'd transform K-State into a bona fide national title contender - and skyrocket his own market value as a recruiter, and head coach. Someplace. . .