Mark Manges of Maryland for Heisman Trophy 1977? If early publicity helps, he's got a shot.

The 1977 NCAA football preview is out, available for showing by groups, and you better believe you can check it out by calling the U of M football office (454-2125 or 454-2128). The 25-minute film narrated by ABC-TV's Keith Jackson features the Terps as one of the nation's prospective top teams and zeroes in on Manges vis-a-vis Heisman.

Yeah, but can he beat out Larry Dick? . . .

Don Meredith isn't the only pro quarterback type on the move (see the TV Column in Style). That Redskin Park habitue of last summer, 1971 Heisman winner Pat Sullivan, has moved on from Chicago before so much as a howdy-do to the club that signed him a few weeks ago. Sold to the San Francisco 49ers, he's one less competitor for Manges' Maryland predecessor, Bear starter Bob Avellini. And to make room for Sulliv who gets waived by new 49er boss Joe Thomas? Naturally, Marty Domres, who Colt general manager Thomas shipped from Baltimore to Frisco last season, and who doubtless knew he was gone again when old buddy Thomas jumped over to Candlestick . . .

Plenty of room in San Diego, says Charger coach Tommy Prothro, fror both newly acquired James Harris - whom Prothro gave his NFL start when he brought the Grambling man in as a "red shirt" free agent 4 1/2 years ago with the L.A. Rams - and holdover starter Dan Fouts. Noting the rate of injuries around the league, Prothro figures he needs both for depth, "no way we're going to trade Fouts," and let 'em battle it out for No. 1 . . .

Re injuries, the NFL owners enacted several rules changes before winding up their New York meeting yesterday and most noteworthy, perhaps, was a ban on the head slap by defensive linemen in their initial charge toward "meeting at the quarterback," or whatever. That's a slap at George Allen, who was bent on keeping that edge for his favorite unit. But, something of a trade-off in abating the war in the trenches, the league also is clarifying restrictions on offensive blocking to include use of hands and arms above opponent's shoulders . . .

Sugar Ray Leonard, who wants to look pretty all over for his career(s) in boxing and on camera, had surgery for cosmetic purposes this week on his right kneecap. The doctor at George Washington Hospital found some glass, result of a childhood fall, inside a cyst that had formed. No complications, bring on pro opponent No. 4 . . . What does Texas Ranger owned Brad Corbett's fistic encounter with an evidently boozy fan in the Cleveland stands Tuesday night portend for Friday's Beer Night in the Indians' stadium, starring

GOOD, BAD, UGLY - The good: Bosocker Cart Yastrzemski has been named Boston sports personality of the year by the press photogs up there for his unfallingly cooperaflye demeanor . . . The bad: Paul Hutchins, who heads British tennis, put Ilie Nastase on report (again) yesterday for bad behavior last weekend when Romania advanced past U.K. in Davis Cup: "He gave 15 finger gestures on the first day and his language was foul. I get some of my young players copying his behavior and I'm not going to put up with it" . . . The ugly: It's a fine program, but did you ever see a worse acronym than SPASM - Summer Practicum for the Advancement of Sports Medicine? It's coming up at GW, sponsored by the university athletic department, for secondary school trainers, coaches and educators faced with athletic injuries. Next Monday-Friday, registration at Smith Center, 8-8:30 a.m. Monday.

DIED - Of a heart attack in a police drunk tank after he was arrested atop a Houston building from which he threatened to jump, Mack Coleman, 24, former Houston Baptist U. basketball star; the medical examiner found Coleman had not been intoxicated but probably was having an anoxic spell caused by heart disease. His brother, New Orleans Jazz forward E.C. Coleman, was alerted that Mack's condition, an enlarged heart and arterioesclerosis, might be hereditary and he should see a doctor.

GAMESMANSHIP - In Prague, Lord Kilanin officially opened the international Olympic Committee's 79th session with a speech saying he welcomed government assistance in development of sport but that "the national Olympic committes and individual athletes must be protected from becoming the instruments of government direction." That's what the French and English taxts said, but in the Czech version the words "government direction" were changed to "commercial influence." Whatever turns you off . . . The 10C elected 11 new members bringing the panel up to 86. That's 86 men, no women.

SHORT CUT - Olympic champion figure skater Dorothy Hamill, now a pro, and her parents have reached a confidential out-of-court settlement in the sometimes acrimanious dispute over how much her former coach, Carlo Fassi had coming for lessons andother expenses; he'd sued for $100,000.