Harmon Killebrew turned down the Texas Rangers managing job this week, but Frank Robinson wouldn't reject a chance to join the Baltimore Oriole coaching staff in place of Billy Hunter who took the Ranger helm.

In Cleveland,where the Orioles are playing the Indians, Bird manager Earl Weaver said he'd like to have deposed Cleveland skipper Robinson on his staff. At home in California, F. Robby offered, "If I got the chance to return to Baltimore, it would be almost like coming home" - to the town where he started 1966-71.

"We'll stay where we are for the time being," said general manager Hank Peters. "I talked with Earl and told him to give it some thought, and I'll do the same thing, and then we'll sit down next week and discuss it more when the club gets back.'

The Orioles have four coaches, so fell no pressing need to replace Hunter. Still, one of those four is player - coach Brooks Robinson, who wants no part of a coaching box on the baseline - wher Hunter held forth since 1964.

Weaver, sounding unworried at the prospect of such a man looking over his shoulder, declared, "You'd have to want a man with Frank's experience and knowledge". . .

Killebrew told the home folks around the Idaho-Oregon border, "That's right. The Rangers wanted me." The former Senators Twins slugger (573 homers to Robinsons's 586) said that when he headed for a meeting with Ranger owner Brad Corbett at a Beverly Hills, Calif., hotel, "I had it in my mind that I was going to accept the offer and manage the club." Then he decided, a la Eddie Stanky, "Family comes first . . .

Ah, the Killer never was blood-thirsty enough to be a manager - at least not in the Billy Martin mold. Yankee manager Martin's parting gloat after the revenge sweep of Boston: "Bill Campbell is a good pitcher, but they can't use him constantly I'm also picking him for the All-Star Game (July 19). That means he won't be able to work the Sunday before in the Red Sox' doubleheader with Milwaukee." What say, commissioner? . . .

Investigators into the disappearance of the thoroughbred mare Fanfreluche, due to deliver a Secretariat foal in January, now say she was stolen by someone "very, very familiar" with Claiborne Farm near Lexington, Ky. The hunt goes on . . .

And one of the officiers at least marginally involved might be Gil Foushee, a Fayette County (Lexington) sheriff's deputy - who trades in his badge for a St. Louis Cardinal football uniform soon. Foushee is a story in that the Cards offered him a free-agent contract as a wide receiver. Surprise the heck out of the U. of Kentucky athletic department, because Foushee caught one pass in three years on the Wildcat varsity. A Card spokesman said they'd heard Foushee "supposedly has good hands." Kentucky coach Fran Curel knows that - he used Foushee as regular holder for his placekicker. A U.K. publicist added that the Redskins invited the 5-foot-8, 160-pound Lexington native to a Redskin Park tryout and "he was one of the last ones out. They kept seven receivers and he was number eight"... So when Foushee makes it with the Cards and beats the 'Skins with a super catch, St Louis can gloat that'll teach ol' George, hiring away our conditioning coach Jim Curzi last year. Meantime, the Cards recouped the other day.

They replaced Curzi with Dave McKinnis, 32 a high school gymnastics coach in Butler, Pa., who, they point out, conducted training-camp conditioning programs for the Redskins the past four years. Besides Washington and St. Louis, only one other NFL team has a full-time conditioning flexibility specialist: the Pittsburgh Steelers, with Paul Urama. The flexibility programs really cut down on muscle pulls last season, say the Cards . . .

Warner Brothers threw a preview of "One on One" the flick opening at area theatres today that is supposed to rip the lid off college basketball recruiting and coaching abuses, and had Lefty Driesell, Bob Tallent and John Thompson see what they thought of it.

Maryland's Driesell: "A good movie but not realistic. I don't think a coach like that (Fictitious Moreland Smith of fictitious Western University) would last five minutes today."

Georgetown's Thompson: "I'm afraid it will perpetuate stereotypes."

George Washington's Tallent: "Wow, did you see how many players they had - enough for a football squad!"

The man from Warner Brothers countered the man from Maryland with a copy of a Louisville paper quoting U. of Louisville coach Denny Crum regarding the movie coach who gives his freshman recruit protagonist the treatment: "There are coaches like that."