Jaws has come to the race track in the incarantion of a 3-year-old throughbred named Marinsky. And, look out, plungers, he could be bound for the U.S. of A.

Marinsky, American-bred, Irish-trained, was banned for life from British race courses - immediately after finishing first by 1 1/2 lengths Thursday in the July Cup at New-market. Marinsky bit the jockey, Paul Cook, of the runner-up steed, and it wasn't his first offense. This was the third time in four races this season that Marinsky was subjected to stewards' inquiry for interfering with other horses during a race (this time he was disqualified to second and Cook's mount Gentihombre - "nice guy" in French - was promoted to the victory circle).

Blinkers and a muzzle were ordered for our hero, or villan, after he savaged a horse named Relkino at Epsom last month and won his "Jaws" nickname in the British papers. Now his handlers are pondering a go on this side of the Atlantic.

Commentator Michael Seely laments the ban on the $225,000 yearling buy, an "exciting horse that fires the blood and is the life and breath of racing." Marinsky's distinguished trainer. Vincent O'Brien of Ireland, says, "I cannot understand it . . . At home he is all sweetness and light" . . .

Seattle Slew is trying to make it up with an equine good deed in his "Golden Gallops" before the fans at Longacres race track near Seattle yesterday and today. The once-beaten Triple Crowner is a winner again, a cut of ticket sales to his appearances (maybe $80,000) being divided between cancer research at the University of Washington medical school and equine researcher at Washington State U.'s school of veterinary medicinc. The WSU vets are deep into the use of cryosurgery, artificial knee joints and other sophisticated devlopments for the good of the species . . .

Wimbledon champions Bjorn Borg and Virginia Wade head the cast for tonight's (11:30 p.m. WRC-TV-4) World Team Tennis all-star matches inSan Diego. Last year's turned into a jolly good wee-hours show with a "super-overtime" finish. Borg debuted the other night with the Cleveland Nets and brought out a record Boston crowd (6,113); but what price glory, San Diego's Frirs capitalized on Kerry Reid 6, Wade 1 to beat the New York Apples. Not only out of the All-Star Game but out of tennis for the year, most likely, is Phoenix Racquet doubes specialist - Chris Evert's partner - Kristien Shaw. Medics discovered Shaw herniated a lumbar disc in a match against Martina Navratilova in the Scottish Open . . . You haven't seen Jan Stephenson listed in the LPGA golf scores these couple of weeks becaue she spilled scalding water on her leg recently . . .

National League All-Star cornermen Steve Garvey and Ron Cey, with 150 RBI between them through Thursday, bid fair to break the Dodger (L.A. and Brooklyn) record for runs batted in by a tandem. Garvey's 79 at midseason compare with his carcer high of 111 for a whole year; Cey has 71 with a career top of 101, they may challenge the team mark of 272 by Tommy Davis (153) and Frank Howard (119) in 1962 . . . But the dangers of All-Star voting starting so far in advance of the July 19 game are demonstrated by Cey's virtually two-to-one lead over Mike Schmidt at third base. Schmidt is up to .291 and only leads the league, as usual, in home runs, going into last night had cracked 18 of 'em in his last 30 games (25 for the season); in his last 26 plate appearances had reached 22 times, with four comers, a triple, double, five singles, eight walks, twice hit by pitch, once via error . . . How baseball All-Stars are selected, con'd: Milwaukee manager Alex Grammas' wife, Tula, and four children filled out and submitted 20,000 ballots - all the Xs on the American League side for Brewers, and all the NL votes for Cincinnati Reds. Grammas was a Cincy coach under Sparky Anderson for several years and, as Mrs. G. notes, "If you want to know the real truth, I think the kids left their hearts in Cincinnati, just all grew up Reds fans" . . .

Dave Puddington, 48, of Springfield, brings college football head-coaching experience (Kent State, no less, and previously Washington U. of St. Louis) to the post he accepted yesterday: coach at Lake Braddock High in the tough Northern Virginia AAA circuit . . . Willie Lanier, the K.C. Chief linebacker, recently moved into Salisbury, a secluded, wooded development of $100,000-$200,000 homes in Richmond; a graduate of the Virginia capital's Maggie Walker High School, he is assistant director of labor relqtions for Philip Morris, Inc. at its corporate HQ. No matter, Salisbury Country Club has rejected his application for membership. Sorry, no blacks; and no law against discrimination by race in private clubs . . . PGA Tour commissioner Deane Beman has announced sites and dates for the regional qualifying rounds preceding the Nov. 9 fall finals at Pinehurst for the next competition for tour cards and, for once, this area is involved. Mid-Atlantic Regional will be at International Town and Country, Fairfax.

Al Hunter, the suspended Notre Dame running back, announced yesterday he will go to court seeking reinstatement. His attorney alleged due process of law was violated by the dean of students; Hunter inists he was cleared of breaking university rules, viz., visiting a female student in her room after hours and was suspended "for doing nothing" . . . Tony Dorsett nothing would have been made of it." The Pitt Cowboy was talking of misdemeanor assault charges he faces for an embroglic with a bartender and barmaid in a Dallas disco this week . . . Cleon Jones, [WORD ILLEGIBLE] former Met outfielder, vows to appeal his conviction, $250 fine plus $168 costs in alleged assault on two police officers in an altercation over a minortraffic violation. It happened in the parking lot of a Mobile, Ala., barbecue resturant that is now Jones' livelhood . . . NBA commissioner Lary O'Brien has called league owners to an emergency meeting Wednesday in Chicago on the Nets-Knicks dispute over the project Net move into New Jersey . . . In the American Professional Slo-Pitch League, the slumping Cincinnati Suds have fired manager Clyde (Soapy) Stafford. He responded by quitting as the Suds' ace pitcher - and, Stafford noted, his 10.2 earned run average is the lowest in the softball league . . .

San Diego owner Gene Klein and the 49ers deny a report that Dan Fouts, Charger quarterback who testifited in court in Minneapols tihat he wants a change of scene, has been offered to San Francisco in trade. Fouts grew up around the Niners; his father, Bob Fouts, broadcast their games . . . N.Y. Jet coach Walt Michaels, in picking up 49er discard Marty Domres, gives him no grand illusions, says, "We're glad to have a player of Marty's experience as a possible backup for Richard Todd" . . . The Philadelphia Eagles, perennial vendors of early-summer optimism, this time are soft-pedaling. Coach Dick Vermeil promises, "I'm not saying it (a winner) will happen this year but we will turn the corner ventually." To which The Post's man about the NFL, Dave Brady, reacts: "Yeah, they'll turn the corner when they get some outside speed."