Paul Brown, at 69, warns his NFL brethren as they open preseason camps that he is still running the football show in Cincinnati, and woe unto those teams directed by "nonfootball people."

Brown, coach of the dynastic Cleveland Browns before coming back from pasture at La Jolla, Calif., to found the AFC's Cincinnati Bengals, says, "After a game, I'll sit down with Bill Johnson on Monday, just the two of us, and we'll talk over the things we see." Brown picked Johnson to succeed him as coach a year ago but, no secret, "The ultimate decision always come back to me. Nobody is cut unless I say something. Nobody is kept without my say. These are franchise assets. I want to have influence in policies involving players and money and things of that sort."

So, VP-GM Brown has son Mike as assistant general manager and son Pete as director of player personnel and pontificates:

"Whenever nonfootball people get involved with a franchise, when they start calling the shots and making the decision - well, that's when you see a lot of franchise in trouble. . . . I've been at parties where some of these nonfootball people brag about how much they lose. They get to laughing about their had franchises - it's almost a status symbol for one guy to say he lost $1.5 million and another guy says. "That's nothing, I lost $1.7 million.' That's not my idea of fun" . . .

Right on - but careful, coach, old football man George Halas hasn't won anything since a fellow named Goerge Allen was coaching his defense. The same George Allen had two sons standing in for him at the Redskin Park news conference announcing his long-term contract renewal, and might George Jr. and Bruce be the Mike and Pete Brown of the future? . . .

All of a sudden, Mike Hegan, who citicized his manager this week, is a nonbaseball man. Griping about lack of playing time, the veteran first baseman of the Milwaukee Brewers said that Alex Granmas, as a manager, makes a good third-base coach. And as a critic, the club decided yesterday, Hegan make a good free agent . . . Hegan said it won't break his heart if nobody picks him up for the $1 unconditional-release waiver price, he's ready to retire to the broadcast profession - but the Cincinnati Reds are going to try to talk lefthander Woodie Fryman out of retiring. Somebody's got to help Tom Seaver get the other side out . . .

Nobody has trouble talking Jim Boston out of retirement. After his flop with the White Sox' Knoxville farm club, old "Ball Four" tried the Mexican League for a month, winning another release. Now the Portland Mavericks are welcoming Bouton, 38, and his knuckler back for his biennial try in the Class A northwest League. Maverick owner Bing Russel even says he gave the maverick pitcher "a 33 1-3 per cent raise. I've got him up to $400 a month this time." . . .

Before leaving Milwaukee. Catfish Hunter - who last week characterized himself as now just a once-a-week pitcher - kept the Yankee pot boiling. Asked by a radio interviewer about the New York pitching rotation, Hunter replied: "I don't think we have one. At Oakland we'd know three weeks in advance who was going to pitch. Over here, you know one day ahead. That's it. You can't prepare yourself to pitch." When he played for the A's. Hunter said, the players helped each other. "Over here, if you jump on a guy, he'll dog. He'll stop. He'll quit on you" . . .

Pete Wysocki, who covets Chris Hanburger's linebacking job, already has supplanted No. 55 as a radio reporter on the Redskin scene. Wysocki, who worked offseason in sales for the station, starts Monday as WRC-A M-910's on-the-air insider at Carlisle, and later, Redskin Park (Hanburger won't be doing same for WMAL-AM-630 this year). The Sucidial Socker's reports will be heard Monday through Friday at 7:11 a.m. and 6:41 p.m.; Saturdays 10:11 a.m. and 6:41 p.m. . . .